Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am running my app with StrictMode activated in development as documented here StrictMode for lower platform versions and noticed an error message that I do not know what to think about nor can I find any reference.

I get a android.os.StrictMode$InstanceCountViolation with values for instances and limit e.g.

instances=3; limit=2

Now I am wondering:

  • A) how is the limit calculated
  • B) how can such a violation actually happen and then I would look into evasive actions.

Any ideas?

share|improve this question
    
Ever figure this out? I've just run into it myself, for a preference activity. –  Andy Dennie Feb 28 '12 at 19:38
1  
I wish... at this stage I think it is a bug in the StrictMode because I was even able to verify that it is wrong using static variables and counting .. –  Manfred Moser Feb 28 '12 at 19:44
add comment

4 Answers

Here is a discussion on google groups about handling the StrictMode InstanceCountViolation. It looks like every different Android version has a different policy so they seem to just disable it. Also the Android docs say about Strict Mode

But don't feel compelled to fix everything that StrictMode finds. In particular, many cases of disk access are often necessary during the normal activity lifecycle. Use StrictMode to find things you did by accident. Network requests on the UI thread are almost always a problem, though.

I think that is what @sri is trying to show with his code.

public class MyApplication extends Application {

@Override 
public void onCreate (){
   super.onCreate();
   // when you create a new application you can set the Thread and VM Policy
   StrictMode.setThreadPolicy(new StrictMode.ThreadPolicy.Builder()
   .detectCustomSlowCalls() // API level 11, to use with StrictMode.noteSlowCode
   .detectDiskReads()
   .detectDiskWrites()
   .detectNetwork()
   .penaltyLog()
   .penaltyFlashScreen() // API level 11
   .build());

//If you use StrictMode you might as well define a VM policy too

   StrictMode.setVmPolicy(new StrictMode.VmPolicy.Builder()
   .detectLeakedSqlLiteObjects()
   .detectLeakedClosableObjects() // API level 11
   .setClassInstanceLimit(Class.forName(“com.apress.proandroid.SomeClass”), 100)
   .penaltyLog()
   .build());
 }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
That all makes sense and I am aware of that. However it still does not really explain how instance counts are calculated and how that calculation is wrong or if I am doing something wrong.. –  Manfred Moser Feb 12 '13 at 1:12
add comment

My understanding is that this violation is used to detect memory leaks. So at that point you should only have 2 instances of the class loaded, but the VM found 3.

I have seen this violation in my code also, but my extra instances were all referenced by weak pointers. So I choose to disable this rule.

share|improve this answer
6  
In my case there should be only a single instance of the activity but it shows limit 2. So I am wondering how it gets the limit. Not to mention how 3 instances appear.. –  Manfred Moser Jul 18 '11 at 4:08
add comment

see the below example it varies based on android version

public class MyApplication extends Application {
    @Override
    public void onCreate() {
        super.onCreate();
        StrictMode.setThreadPolicy(new StrictMode.ThreadPolicy.Builder()
            .detectCustomSlowCalls() // API level 11, to use with StrictMode.noteSlowCode
            .detectDiskReads()
            .detectDiskWrites()
            .detectNetwork()
            .penaltyLog()
            .penaltyFlashScreen() // API level 11
            .build());

        // not really performance-related, but if you use StrictMode you might as well define a VM policy too
        StrictMode.setVmPolicy(new StrictMode.VmPolicy.Builder()
            .detectLeakedSqlLiteObjects()
            .detectLeakedClosableObjects() // API level 11
            .setClassInstanceLimit(Class.forName(“com.apress.proandroid.SomeClass”), 100) // API level 11
            .penaltyLog()
            .build());
    }
}
share|improve this answer
3  
So what are you saying? How is this an answer? –  Manfred Moser Jan 22 '13 at 22:50
add comment

It seems there might be a bug in the StrictMode checking on some devices.

If an Activity is started, and exited and restarted very quickly, you can get a StrictMode.InstanceCountViolation.

However this is simply because the garbage collector has not yet finalized the first instance of the Activity, meaning there are temporarily 2 (or more) instances in memory.

Calling System.gc() before startActivity() or startActivityForResult() will stop the StrictMode.InstanceCountViolation.

This seems to indicate a bug (or perhaps a feature?) in the StrictMode checking.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.