Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am using Nokogiri to parse an HTML page, but I am having odd problems with non-breaking spaces. I tried different encodings, replacing the whitespace, and a few other headache inducing attempts.

Here is the HTML snippet in question:

<td>Amount 15,300&nbsp;at&nbsp;dollars</td>

Note the change for the &nbsp; representation after I use Nokogiri:

<td>Amount 15,300&#xa0;at&#xa0;dollars</td>

And outputting the inner_text:

Amount 15,300 at dollars

This is my base Nokogiri grab, I did try a few alternatives to solve but failed miserably:

doc = Nokogiri::HTML(open(url))

And then I do a doc.search for the item in question.

Note that if I look at the doc, the line shows up with the &#xa0; on that line.

Clarification: I do not think I clearly stated the difficulty I am having. I can't get the inner_text to show up without the strange  symbol.

share|improve this question
1  
&nbsp; is equivalent to &#xa0; or &#160;. The problem is not with nokogiri. In fact, it is doing a great job of normalizing it. Something is wrong with displaying it. What browser are you seeing it on? –  sawa May 10 '11 at 21:03
    
I recognize that Nokogiri is doing what it is supposed to be doing; my problem is that I am trying to get rid of them, but all my attempts at replacing the text have failed. It could just be me trying to use it incorrectly. I use the inner_text and then just output to view, no browser. –  Kraagenskul May 10 '11 at 21:17
    
But aren't you using a browser to see the (rendered result of) view? How else can you see it? –  sawa May 10 '11 at 21:39
    
I am just outputting the inner_text right to the console, via the "puts" method; I am trying to grab the data within the tags. It's the  that is driving me crazy. –  Kraagenskul May 11 '11 at 13:21
1  
If your output is to the console, you should have clearly stated so in the question. That is the most crucial part. The question is not about nokogiri, but is how to output certain characters to the console. –  sawa May 11 '11 at 19:19

3 Answers 3

As @sawa says, the main problem is what you see when writing to the console. It's not correctly displaying the non-breaking space after Nokogiri converts it to the appropriate binary value.

The usual way to fix the problem is to preprocess the content:

require 'nokogiri'

html = '<td>Amount 15,300&nbsp;at&nbsp;dollars</td>'
doc = Nokogiri::HTML::DocumentFragment.parse(html.gsub(/&(?:#xa0|#160|nbsp);/i, ' '))
puts doc.to_html

Which outputs:

<td>Amount 15,300 at dollars</td>
share|improve this answer

I know this is old, but it took me an hour to find out how to solve this problem, and it is really easy once you know. Just pass your string to this function and it will be "de-nbsp-fied".

def strip_html(str)
  nbsp = Nokogiri::HTML("&nbsp;").text
  str.gsub(nbsp,'')
end

You could also replace it whith a space if you wished. May many of you find this answer!

share|improve this answer

Unless you really, really want to keep the &nbsp; notation, there shouldn't be a problem here.

A0 is the hex character code for a non-breaking space. As such, &#xa0; prints a non-breaking space, and is exactly equivalent to &nbsp;. &#160; does the same thing, too.

What Nokogiri is doing here is reading the text node, recognizing the entities, and converting them to their actual string representation internally. Then, when converting it back to an HTML-friendly version of the text node, it represents the non-breaking space by its hex code, rather than taking the performance overhead of looking it up in an entity table, since it's equivalent, anyway.

Assuming that  was what you were seeing and wasn't just an issue pasting into StackOverflow, this is a text encoding issue: the output software (browser?) isn't in UTF-8 mode, so doesn't know how to handle character code A0, so does the best it can. If this is a browser, adding <meta charset="utf-8"> to the head will solve this issue, and will make the rest of the output more Unicode-friendly.

If you really, really want &nbsp;, use gsub to replace them in your final output. Otherwise, don't worry about it.

share|improve this answer
    
The issue is the  on a simple inner_text output, where I am trying to parse the data to put into a database. I tried setting the doc.encoding to utf-8 (strangely, I don't think I tried that encoding until I read your reply), but that did not fix it either. I think the problem is that I am not trying to search for the right character to eliminate. –  Kraagenskul May 10 '11 at 21:37

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.