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I've been working on a small program that calculates the shortest paths for every vertex in a given graph using OpenMP to split up the calculations between multiple threads instead of doing one vertex at a time. While my current implementation works, I want to make it so that I can read the graph data in from a file in the format "vertex1 vertex2 weight" so the graphs aren't hard-coded into the program.

Sources are here: http://pastebin.com/bkR7QysB

Compiled as follows:

g++ -fopenmp GraphTest.cpp WeightedGraph.cpp -o dijkstra

Using the following data as input:

foo derp 50
narf balls 30
foo balls 20
balls derp 60
derp narf 40
derp cox 30
foo narf 50
narf pie 99
cox pie 15
cox narf 10

my output is:

Enter filename: lol.out
Printing all edges currently in graph: 
(foo, derp) : cost 50
(narf, balls) : cost 30
(foo, balls) : cost 20
(balls, derp) : cost 60
(derp, narf) : cost 40
(derp, cox) : cost 30
(foo, narf) : cost 50
(narf, pie) : cost 99
(cox, pie) : cost 15
(cox, narf) : cost 10

[thread:0] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex balls. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(balls, balls : cost 0)
(balls, derp : cost 60)

[thread:0] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex cox. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(cox, cox : cost 0)
(cox, narf : cost 10)

[thread:1] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex derp. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(derp, derp : cost 0)
(derp, cox : cost 30)

[thread:1] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex foo. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(foo, foo : cost 0)
(foo, narf : cost 50)

[thread:2] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex narf. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(narf, narf : cost 0)
(narf, cox : cost 10)

[thread:2] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex pie. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(pie, pie : cost 0)
(pie, cox : cost 15)

This is obviously incorrect - it's supposed to print the shortest path from a vertex to every other vertex in the graph, and yet here it's only printing the shortest path to itself (which is always 0) and the path to only ONE of its directly adjacent neighbors. It's not traversing the graph at all. The weirdest part, however, is that uncommenting that huge block near the end of GraphTest.cpp and commenting out the file-handling code so that the graph data is hard-coded into the program, everything works fine:

Printing all edges currently in graph: 
(foo, derp) : cost 50
(narf, balls) : cost 30
(foo, balls) : cost 20
(balls, derp) : cost 60
(derp, narf) : cost 40
(derp, cox) : cost 30
(foo, narf) : cost 50
(narf, pie) : cost 99
(cox, pie) : cost 15
(cox, narf) : cost 10

[thread:0] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex balls. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(balls, balls : cost 0)
(balls, foo : cost 20)
(balls, narf : cost 30)
(balls, cox : cost 40)
(balls, pie : cost 55)
(balls, derp : cost 60)

[thread:0] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex cox. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(cox, cox : cost 0)
(cox, narf : cost 10)
(cox, pie : cost 15)
(cox, derp : cost 30)
(cox, balls : cost 40)
(cox, foo : cost 60)

[thread:1] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex derp. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(derp, derp : cost 0)
(derp, cox : cost 30)
(derp, narf : cost 40)
(derp, pie : cost 45)
(derp, foo : cost 50)
(derp, balls : cost 60)

[thread:1] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex foo. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(foo, foo : cost 0)
(foo, balls : cost 20)
(foo, derp : cost 50)
(foo, narf : cost 50)
(foo, cox : cost 60)
(foo, pie : cost 75)

[thread:2] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex narf. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(narf, narf : cost 0)
(narf, cox : cost 10)
(narf, pie : cost 25)
(narf, balls : cost 30)
(narf, derp : cost 40)
(narf, foo : cost 50)

[thread:2] Showing single-source shortest path run for source vertex pie. Format is (start, end) : cost.
(pie, pie : cost 0)
(pie, cox : cost 15)
(pie, narf : cost 25)
(pie, derp : cost 45)
(pie, balls : cost 55)
(pie, foo : cost 75)

I honestly have no idea what's going on here. The only thing I can think of is that something somewhere is going out of scope too early and causing my graph object to behave oddly, but if that were true then both outputs should've been wrong... Hopefully someone smarter than me can run this and help me figure out what went wrong.

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1 Answer 1

I'll mention some issues I saw while reading through your code:

  1. Notice that your edge map is indexed by a pair, so what you have implemented here must be a directed graph. Because you are indexing by ( vi, vj ), the edges ( v0, v1 ) and ( v1, v0 ) are distinct and will have different values ( one may not even exist! ). You should probably think of a way to manage your edges so that looking them up isn't dependent on the order.

  2. I don't understand why you are using char*s in code that relies heavily on the Standard Template Library. Strings are your friend!

Now, I think the problem is that you are re-inserting vertices. In your code, you don't do any check to make sure that the vertex you are adding doesn't already exist in the graph. Instead, you just allocate a new vertex and put it in your vertex map. If there is a vertex with that name already, it is overwritten in the map and you lose your only reference to that data. Hence, you have a memory leak, because the replaced vertex is never deleted.

So, if your input file is:

narf balls 50 foo narf 10

Your code will create and add a narf vertex on both lines. This is the only difference that I see thus far, but it is significant and gives a pretty costly bug as well as a memory leak.

As a side note, I don't necessarily see the value in having an edge object. You can easily store all the information for an edge in each vertices _neighbors list. Make that list a map, make an adjacent vertex's name the key and make the cost the value:

_neighborMap[ v0.name() ] = cost;

Having the edge type just seems to add a lot of unnecessary references and complexity. Just a thought...

As I look at your code further, I see that you are actually never deleting any Vertex or Edge objects. If you do not want to use dynamic memory allocation, just make your Graph use instances of Vertex instead of pointers. These are very small objects, so you aren't going to cost yourself much in terms of extra instructions via copy in by simply doing something like:

_internalVertexMap[ "v0" ] = Vertex( "v0" );
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Actually, direction doesn't really matter in this case - method getDistance(Vertex*, Vertex*) does check both ways, so it will report the same distance for both (v1, v2) and (v2, v1) if only one of those is defined. I used new instead of simply doing instances because those really DID fall out of scope way too quickly, and my code segfaulted all over the place until I replaced them with pointers. –  Cirvante May 11 '11 at 1:48
    
Edit: @ dusktreader Thanks for the tip on the repeated insertions overwriting the previous element. I added a quick .find() == .end() check to see if the vertex to insert was already in the map, and that seemed to fix the problem. :) –  Cirvante May 11 '11 at 1:50

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