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I have a function that currently takes in two template parameters. One is expected to be the smart pointer, and the other is expected to be the object type. For example, SmartPtr<MyObject> as the first template parameter and MyObject as the second template parameter.

template <typename T, typename TObject>

I would like to know whether I can determine the second parameter, MyObject, automatically from the first parameter SmartPtr<MyObject> or not so that my template function is written like this:

template <typename T>

And the type TObject in the original template function is automatically determined from T which is expected to be a smart pointer.

As requested, here is the function declaration and its use:

template <typename T, typename TObject>
T* CreateOrModifyDoc(T* doc, MyHashTable& table)
{
    T* ptr = NULL;

    if (!table.FindElement(doc->id, ptr))
    {
        table.AddElement(doc->id, new TObject());
        table.FindElement(doc->id, ptr);
    }       

    return ptr;
}
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Post some code. –  nbt May 10 '11 at 20:48
    
Can you paste the function into your question? –  mkb May 10 '11 at 20:50
    
We can guess, but in order to fully answer your question you'll need to show us the function declaration and how you're calling it as well. –  GManNickG May 10 '11 at 20:51

4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted

If you know that the first template parameter will be the smart pointer type, why not declare your function with only one parameter and use it as such:

template<typename T>
void WhatIsIt(SmartPtr<T> ptr)
{ 
    printf("It is a: %s" typeid(T).name());
}
share|improve this answer
    
-1 Ugh. AsString? –  nightcracker May 10 '11 at 20:56
3  
Seriously? downvote because I chose string as an example code? I just made that up, the function body doesn't even need to be there... –  Dan F May 10 '11 at 20:58
    
@Dan F: No, because you chose string as a type identifier. What's wrong with a typedef? –  nightcracker May 10 '11 at 20:59
    
Whats wrong with having a string version of the type contained within the smart pointer? –  Dan F May 10 '11 at 21:00
1  
@nightcracker: How is that relevant to the validity of this answer? –  John Dibling May 10 '11 at 21:00

Did you write SmartPtr? If so, add this to it

  typedef T element_type;
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Use element_type, not TDeref, so that the nested type's name is consistent with std::shared_ptr<> and std::unique_ptr<>. –  ildjarn May 10 '11 at 20:54
    
@ildjarn Thanks -- done –  Lou Franco May 11 '11 at 13:30

If the classes that can serve as the first template parameter can be made to provide a handy typedef by a common name, you can do this:

template <typename T>
class SmartPtr
{
  public:
    typedef T element_type;

  // ...
};


template <typename PtrType, typename ObjType=PtrType::element_type>
void your_function_here(const PtrType& ptr)
{
  // ...
}
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@ildjarn: Good call. Edited. –  Drew Hall May 10 '11 at 20:56

All smart pointers I know of support the member ::element_type. For example boost's shared_ptr: http://www.boost.org/doc/libs/1_46_1/libs/smart_ptr/shared_ptr.htm#element_type, but also the std smart pointers support this convention.

template <typename T> class SharedPtr {
public:
    typedef T element_type;

    // ...
};
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