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Lets say a graphic World,lets say an API of a World, and Actor, and I built an object from new class name Food that inherent from Actor but in certain situations I need the object to be disappeared from my world. what should be a good way to do so ?

I tried this:

public void killFood ()
    {
            getWorld().removeObject(this);  // >>>>>Kill any object that inherate from Food and operate this method.
    }

But it didn't killed any kind of object from Class that inherent from Food... why ?

I wrapped it (in the Food class) with:

public void act() 
    {
        if (canMove())
            move();
        else
            killFood();
    }



public boolean canMove()
    {
        World myWorld = getWorld();
        int x = getX();
        int y = getY();
         y--;
        // test for outside border
        if (x >= myWorld.getWidth() || y >= myWorld.getHeight()) 
            return false;
        else if (x < 0 || y < 0)    // if out of the 1st quarter
            return false;
        return true;    // if inside 1st quarter & borders it can be move. 
    }

But the object did not disappeared... why ?

Thanks !!

========================================================================================== EDIT: canMove method & Mushroom Class

public boolean canMove()
    {
        World myWorld = getWorld();
        int x = getX();
        int y = getY();

        // test for outside border
        if (x >= myWorld.getWidth() || y >= myWorld.getHeight()) {
            return false;
        }
        else if (x < 0 || y < 0) {
            return false;
        }
        return true;
    }

public class Mushroom  extends Food
{
    private final int NEED_TOGO_LEFT = 3;
    private int mushroomGotDown=0; // counter for regular +1 down steps

    public void move()
    {
            mushroomGotDown++;
            //  if mushroom didn't got down 2 times, go down one time.
            if (mushroomGotDown != NEED_TOGO_LEFT) 
                setLocation(getX() , getY() + 1);
                else    //  mushroom got down twise, third will be 1 step left.
                {
                    setLocation(getX() - 1 , getY());
                    mushroomGotDown=0;
                }    
    } 
}   // end of class Mushroom
share|improve this question
    
Without seeing the implementation of removeObject(), it's hard to tell you why removeObject() doesn't work. –  EboMike May 10 '11 at 21:59
    
Could you post code for the method 'removeObject'? –  eQui May 10 '11 at 22:00
    
It's in the API link above... the link: greenfoot.org/doc/javadoc –  Master C May 10 '11 at 23:57
    
Even if the CODE was in the API link (it isn't), please post relevant code in the question as a convenience for the people answering. –  EboMike May 11 '11 at 0:14
    
Why you can't see this method summary in the 'World' class API ? Also I added an example for an extended class named 'Mushroom' I wrote and the mushroom (when you're create an object from it) does not disappear at all... I am really desperate with this issue because 'on the paper' it should be working, but actually it doesn't.... –  Master C May 11 '11 at 0:21

2 Answers 2

I assume that your code looks like this:

public abstract class Food {
    ...
    public void killFood () {
        getWorld().removeObject(this);
    }

    public void act() {
        if (canMove()) {
            move();
        } else { 
            killFood();
        }
    }
}

public class Cheezeburger extends Food {
    ...
}

On the face of it, that should work.

Possible reasons why a cheezeburger doesn't get removed include:

  • your code isn't actually calling act() on the cheezeburger,
  • getWorld() returns a different world to the one you are expecting,
  • World.removeObject(...) is not working properly,
  • the Cheezeburger class (or a superclass) has overridden act or canMove or killFood and the override method(s) do the wrong thing.

All of these scenarios can be summarized as "the bug is somewhere else".


Assuming that you've inspected your code and cannot find the problem, the next step should be to run it using a debugger, and single step it through the code that is not working to see what is really happening.

share|improve this answer
    
act() is called automatically by the interface. World.removeObject(...) is been tested on other Class that inherate directly from Actor and it's working... Cheezeburger style class do override, BUT on the move() class only. So we stay only with the possibly "getWorld() returns a different world to the one you are expecting". Can you check my edited code again and help me find the mine ? thnx ;-) –  Master C May 11 '11 at 0:00
    
@Master C - the extra code you posted doesn't appear to contain any problems ... assuming that the canMove logic is correct (which I cannot judge.) –  Stephen C May 11 '11 at 1:12
    
I copied the canMove() method from other class that inherit from Actor class (Food is a subclass of Actor) and because the other class and Food are both inherits from Actor and because that canMove() works fine with the other class I assume Food should be the same. But still I can't figure out why it's not working... –  Master C May 11 '11 at 1:41
    
If you need to take a bet, what seems to be wrong in this code (from your experience of course) ? thnx –  Master C May 11 '11 at 18:37
    
@Master C - as I said above, I cannot judge. Please follow the advice in the last sentence of my Answer. –  Stephen C May 11 '11 at 23:31

It looks the getWorld().removeObject(this) will only remove a specific instance from your world. It won't remove all instances of a specific class from your world.

You need to call getWorld().removeObject on each specific instance of a class that you want to remove.

So to see how this works try something like this:

Food foo1 = new Food();
Food foo2 = new Food();
Food foo3 = new Food();

World world = new World();
world.add(foo1, ...);  //Be sure to place each object in a distinct position so you can see each one.
world.add(foo2, ...);  
world.add(foo3, ...);

//Now delete one. 
foo1.killFood(); 

//one of th ethree should go away. 

Anyways, I think from your questions, that you are confusing instances of a class with the class itself.

This is of course assuming that removeObject works.

share|improve this answer
    
So you say that getWorld().removeObject(this); is legal to be used with 'this' ? and if it is a graphic interface why the items that inherent from Food didn't die when I use killFood() if the item touch the ground ? –  Master C May 10 '11 at 22:13
    
getWorld().removeObject(this); is fine. It will remove a specific instance of food from your world. I'm not sure why you think that items that inherit from food will die. Perhaps inherit doesn't mean what you think it does? –  Karthik Ramachandran May 10 '11 at 22:15
    
Now I understood you as well, so now can you fix my code (by editing yours, above) and show me how to fix it to care that every object that will create from a class that inherent from Food will be die when he will get on floor ? I really need it in order to understand it as well... –  Master C May 10 '11 at 22:18
    
You need to call killFood on each instance. so foo2.killFood, foo3.killFood. etc... –  Karthik Ramachandran May 10 '11 at 22:21
    
But the problem is that I need that for any Food type object who touch the floor (especially for a future Classes that inherent from Food) will have that ability without write it in each Class that extends Food, but only to write it in Food itself... :-( –  Master C May 10 '11 at 22:24

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