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I get an addres of string from assembler into C, and I need to get content of this address. How to do it? Google gives C++ examples with reinterpret_cast, but it not working in C (I suppose). I will appreciate if you will note needed libs too, tenx

#include <stdio.h> 
#include <stdlib.h> 

unsigned long const1(void); 

int main()
{ 
    printf("Const: %d\n", const1()); 
    return 0; 
}
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2  
show us the code you've tried and where it doesn't work. – Doug T. May 10 '11 at 21:59
    
What compiler? What architecture? – MrAnonymous May 10 '11 at 22:01
    
#include <stdio.h> #include <stdlib.h> unsigned long const1(void); int main() { printf("Const: %d\n", const1()); return 0; } – yons88 May 10 '11 at 22:03
    
const1() returns address of string – yons88 May 10 '11 at 22:04
    
architecture: ARM Xscale – yons88 May 10 '11 at 22:05
up vote 3 down vote accepted

If you've already got the address and you know it's a null terminated string, then all you need to do is treat it like a string.

printf("%s", (char*)alleged_string_address);
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Preliminary answer while I wait for your info:

   char* foo = (char*)...pointer from assembly...;
    *foo = 'a'; /* write a to the address pointed at by foo */
    foo++;      /* increment the address of foo by 1 */
    *foo = 'b'; /* write b to that address.  foo now contains ab, if it points at RAM.  */

This answer is geared toward embedded systems. If you need a pointer to something like a peripheral register, use volatile to avoid compiler optimizations.

   volatile char* foo = (char*)...pointer from assembly...;
    *foo = 'a'; /* write a to the address pointed at by foo */
    foo++;      /* increment the address of foo by 1 */
    *foo = 'b'; /* write b to that address.  foo now contains ab, if it points at RAM.  */
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+1 for volatile, which was made specifically for stuff like this. – orlp May 10 '11 at 22:13

If you know there's a byte with zero in it after the string then try this:

char* p = (char*) <your address here>;
// use p for whatever here

If there's no zero following the string then the standard string functions in C will fail.

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