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I have an enum class with the cardinal directions(North, East, South, West):

public enum Direction {
    NORTH,
    EAST,
    SOUTH,
    WEST;
}

Is there a way to be able to use multiple names for the same thing? For example something like this:

public enum Direction {
    NORTH or N,
    EAST or E,
    SOUTH or S,
    WEST or W;
}

In practice what I want is to be able and sign to a variable either N or NORTH and have the two operations be exactly the same.

Example:

Direction direction1=new Direction.NORTH;
Direction direction2=new Direction.N;
//direction1==direction2
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3 Answers 3

public enum Direction {
  NORTH,
  EAST,
  SOUTH,
  WEST,
  ;

  // Convenience names.
  public static final Direction N = NORTH;
  public static final Direction E = EAST;
  public static final Direction S = SOUTH;
  public static final Direction W = WEST;
}

is legal, but "N" will not work with the auto-generated valueOf method. I.e. Direction.valueOf("N") will throw an IllegalArgumentException instead of returning Direction.NORTH.

You also cannot write case N:. You have to use the full names in switches whose value is a Direction.

Other than that, the abbreviated form should work just as well as the full version. You can use Direction.N in EnumSets, compare it for equality Direction.N == Direction.NORTH, get its name() (which is "NORTH"), import static yourpackage.Direction.N;, etc.

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You could do something like this (East and West omitted).

public enum Direction {
    NORTH {
        @Override
        Direction getDirection() {
            return NORTH;
        }
    },
    N {
        @Override
        Direction getDirection() {
            return NORTH;
        }
    },
    SOUTH {
        @Override
        Direction getDirection() {
            return SOUTH;
        }
    },
    S {
        @Override
        Direction getDirection() {
            return SOUTH;
        }
    }   ;

    abstract Direction getDirection();
}

Then you could something like this

public void foo(Direction arg) {
  Direction d = arg.getDirection();
}

Then you will always be dealing with only NORTH, SOUTH, EAST, and WEST.

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1+. Haven't thought about that. –  Anthony Accioly May 10 '11 at 22:29
    
But N == NORTH will return false. This means that you've always got to remember to use getDirection() which is cumbersome and makes your code fragile ... and probably more verbose than it was before you added N as an abbreviation. –  Stephen C May 10 '11 at 23:47
    
@Stephen Agreed. It's not an ideal solution, but just "A" solution. –  JustinKSU May 11 '11 at 14:57
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Hum, maybe having a "client Enum" with variables that hold the actual "meaningful Enum"?

public enum Direction {
    NORTH(BaseDirection.NORTH),
    N(BaseDirection.NORTH),
    EAST(BaseDirection.EAST),
    E(BaseDirection.EAST),
    SOUTH(BaseDirection.SOUTH),
    S(BaseDirection.SOUTH),
    WEST(BaseDirection.WEST),
    W(BaseDirection.WEST);

    private BaseDirection baseDirection;

    private Direction(BaseDirection baseDirection) {
        this.baseDirection = baseDirection;
    }

    public BaseDirection getBaseDirection() {
        return baseDirection;
    }           
}

public enum BaseDirection {
    NORTH,
    EAST,
    SOUTH,
    WEST;
}

Kinda overkill, but you can expose Direction to client code and use getBaseDirection for actual logic.

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You'll need to do more if you want something like: N == NORTH to be true. –  ChrisH May 10 '11 at 23:42
    
The problem with this is that N != NORTH. You would need to compare direction values using equals, and switch(direction){...} would need to use both alternatives. It kind of defeats the purpose of using enums. –  Stephen C May 10 '11 at 23:42
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