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why are the 2 following code segments not equivalent?

void print (char* s) {
  if (*s == '\0')
     return;
    print(s+1);
   cout << *s;
}

void print (char* s) {
  if (*s == '\0')
     return;
    print(++s);
   cout << *s;
}

thank you

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who says they are not equivilent? –  Daniel A. White May 10 '11 at 23:08
1  
Looks like school exercise. –  Klaim May 10 '11 at 23:08
    
Did you actually compiled it and see whether they are equivalent or not ? –  Mahesh May 10 '11 at 23:09
1  
oh boy, i wanted to asked difference between s+1 and ++s –  user695652 May 10 '11 at 23:30
    
@user - Ok... tried my part in making you understand. –  Mahesh May 10 '11 at 23:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Since it looks like the OP changed print(s++) to print(++s), which is hugely different, here's an explanation for this new version.

In the first example, you have:

print(s+1);
cout << *s;

s+1 does not modify s. So if s is 4, and you print(s+1), afterwards s will still be 4.

print(++s);
cout << *s;

In this case, ++s modifies the local value of s. It increments it by 1. So if it was 4 before print(++s), it will be 5 afterwards.

In both cases, a value equivalent to s+1 would be passed to the print function, causing it to print the next character.

So the difference between the 2 functions is that the first one will recursively print character #0, then 1, 2, 3, ..., while the second function prints 1, 2, 3, 4, ... (it skips the first character and prints the "\0" afterwards).

Example:
For the s+1 version, print("hello") will result in h e l l o
For the ++s version, print("hello") will result in e l l o \0

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The ++ operator increments the pointer value, but then returns the original value ... so print(s++) will print the value of s before the increment, since even though it adds a value of 1 to s, making the value stored at s equal to s+1, it still returns the original value of s as the result of the operation. On the otherhand print(s+1) prints the value after the increment, but very importantly does not modify the original value of s. So the result of the statement s+1 is just a new temporary pointer value ... the original value of s is not modified.

Furthermore, since you've incremented and changed the value of s with the ++ operator, when you call cout, you're now printing the value to wherever the new pointer is pointing (this could cause a crash or segmentation fault if you're not careful and there's no user accessible memory at the new memory location s is pointing to). With s+1, the value of s remains unmodified, so the result of cout will be to wherever s was originally pointing.


Edit:

As Michael points out, this is actually a recursive function, so the second example simply keeps calling print() with the same argument, since as mentioned before, the returned value from s++ is the original value of s. That means you'll end up with a stack overflow at some point and just crash unless the value that s pointed to was already the NULL character.

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2  
Actually, the second version will not print anything, but will eventually cause a stack overflow unless the string is empty (or, with incredibly clever optimization on the compiler's part, loop infinitely). The method calls itself with the same argument it received, due to using post-increment instead of pre-increment. –  Michael Madsen May 10 '11 at 23:20
    
Yes, that is very true ... will edit above. –  Jason May 10 '11 at 23:26
    
++s isn't the same as s++, so the second example won't cause a stack overflow. Did he edit the question and change it from s++? –  Seth Carnegie May 11 '11 at 0:10
    
Must have, since my answer is not the only answer to refer to the s++ statement, so I don't think I was reading it wrong ... –  Jason May 11 '11 at 0:26
  1. Both of the expressions s++ and s+1 are to do with increasing the position of the pointer itself, not the value contained at the pointer locations

  2. The value of s++ is just s, and the value of s+1 is, well, one position further on than s!

  3. The value of s after executing s++ is one position further on than it was before. After using s+1, the value of s is unchanged.

Therefore the order they print out the letters is reversed!

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I will try to explain an example of pre and post increment from which you can solve the question posted yourself.

#include <iostream>

void foo(int num)
{
    std::cout << num << "\n" ;
}

int main()
{
    int number = 10 ;

    foo( number++ ) ;
    foo( ++number ) ;
    foo( number + 1 ) ;

    getchar() ;

    return 0 ;
}

Output:

10
12
13

Why 10?

foo( number++ ) ;

Post-increment operation is done on number. Meaning, value of number is first passed to foo and then the value of number is incremented upon foo return. So, after function return, number is 11.

Why 12?

foo( ++number ) ;

Pre-increment operation is done on number. Meaning, before even call to foo, the value of number is incremented to 12. And then it is passed to foo. So, even after the function return, number is still 12.

Why 13?

It's just straight forward. Value of number is not modified but passed a value adding 1 to the value of number. In this process, number is not modified. So, even after function return, number is still 12.

Hope this helps to solve the problem yourself ( though in your case it is paper-pencil exercise ) :)

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@user - Since you need to understand recursion and also the scope of the variables in the recursion tree, this thread should be helpful stackoverflow.com/questions/5852237/… –  Mahesh May 10 '11 at 23:43

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