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I am making a collection of math functions. I used if statements to create error messages and cut down on user errors.. I don't think I did it right.

string error_0;
string error_i;

if (num1 == 0;) {error_0 = "You cannot divide by zero. Fail."}
    else {error_0 = "";}

if (num1=<0;) {error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers."} //for sqroot function
    else {error_i = "";}

if (num2=<0;) {error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers."}
    else {error_i = "";}

... this gives me the following error messages in code::blocks compiling.

  • expected ")" before ";" token (the if lines)
  • expected primary expression before ")" token (the if lines)
  • else without a previous if (just for the last else)

I'm really new at C++ and from the examples I have everything looks correct. Help would be appreciated. Thanks.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You need a semicolon after your strings and don't need one inside the if conditions. Also, the operator is <=, not =<.

string error_0;
string error_i;

if (num1 == 0) {error_0 = "You cannot divide by zero. Fail.";}
    else {error_0 = "";}

if (num1 <= 0) {error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers.";} //for sqroot function
    else {error_i = "";}

if (num2 <= 0) {error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers.";}
    else {error_i = "";}
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Ah, thank you very much, worked like a charm. My examples may be a little too old or too confusing for me :P. btw i'm sort of new... when a question is answered do we need to delete it, or leave it up for others to find answers? –  TwoRoses May 11 '11 at 0:45
    
@TwoRoses: you leave the question up. If you think an answer completely solves your problem, mark the checkmark to its left. This serves to answer similar questions others may have in the future. –  Borealid May 11 '11 at 0:46

Don't put semi-colons in '()' brackets. On the other hand, you have to end each instruction with a semi-colon (and you didn't do it in the first '{}' brackets). It should be:

if (num1 == 0) {error_0 = "You cannot divide by zero. Fail.";}
else {error_0 = "";}

BTW, you don't have to use brackets if you use a simple instruction after if or else, it can be as well:

if (num1 == 0)
    error_0 = "You cannot divide by zero. Fail.";
else
    error_0 = "";
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+1, beat me to it, and a better answer. –  Tim May 11 '11 at 0:35
string error_i;
if (num1=<0;) {error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers."}
else {error_i = "";} 
  • the comparison operator you want is <= (think less than or equal) rather than =<
  • parenthesised expressions don't need semicolons but statements do
    • here if (expression) { [first-statement-when-true; [second...;]] } else { [first-statement-when-false; [second...;]] }

That's enough to get it to work, but std::strings default-constructor themselves to be "" anyway, so you don't need the else { error_i = ""; } code at all...

string error_i;

if (n <= 0)
    error_i = "Sorry, can't do imaginary numbers.";

OR, you can capture the this-or-that feel of your original and immediately give error_i a meaningful value as in:

string error_i = n <= 0 ? "Sorry, can't..." : "";

Above, ? and : select the value between or after them based on the truth of the prior expression (n <= 0), then that is assigned as the initial value of error_i. Some people would think this is bad because setting a std::string to "" is pointless and possibly slightly inefficient (they're empty after default construction anyway), but having code that clearly expresses your thinking about the program is usually more important.

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