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In the following example code, I attach an onclick handler to the span containing the text "foo". The handler is an anonymous function that pops up an alert().

However, if I append to the parent node's innerHTML, this onclick handler gets destroyed -- clicking "foo" fails to pop up the alert box.

Is this fixable?

<html>
 <head>
 <script type="text/javascript">

  function start () {
    myspan = document.getElementById("myspan");
    myspan.onclick = function() { alert ("hi"); };

    mydiv = document.getElementById("mydiv");
    mydiv.innerHTML += "bar";
  }

 </script>
 </head>

 <body onload="start()">
   <div id="mydiv" style="border: solid red 2px">
     <span id="myspan">foo</span>
   </div>
 </body>

</html>
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This question is related to the 'appending new fields to a form erases user input' problem. The selected answer fixes both of these problems very nicely. –  MattT Jul 24 at 18:02

8 Answers 8

up vote 43 down vote accepted

Unfortunately, assignment to innerHTML causes the destruction of all child elements, even if you're trying to append. If you want to preserve child nodes (and their event handlers), you'll need to use DOM functions:

function start() {
    var myspan = document.getElementById("myspan");
    myspan.onclick = function() { alert ("hi"); };

    var mydiv = document.getElementById("mydiv");
    mydiv.appendChild(document.createTextNode("bar"));
}

Edit: Bob's solution, from the comments. Post your answer, Bob! Get credit for it. :-)

function start() {
    var myspan = document.getElementById("myspan");
    myspan.onclick = function() { alert ("hi"); };

    var mydiv = document.getElementById("mydiv");
    var newcontent = document.createElement('div');
    newcontent.innerHTML = "bar";

    while (newcontent.firstChild) {
        mydiv.appendChild(newcontent.firstChild);
    }
}
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Is there a substitute that can append an arbitrary blob of HTML? –  mike Feb 27 '09 at 17:55
24  
newcontent= document.createElement('div'); newcontent.innerHTML= arbitrary_blob; while (newcontent.firstChild) mydiv.appendChild(newcontent.firstChild); –  bobince Feb 27 '09 at 18:13
    
Nice, Bob! If you post that as a well-formatted answer, I'll select it. –  mike Feb 27 '09 at 18:17
    
@bobince — I've updated my answer with your technique, since you haven't posted it yet yourself. If you create your own answer, go ahead and roll mine back. :-) –  Ben Blank Feb 27 '09 at 20:25
    
@Ben: you don't need the call to newcontent.removeChild(). Bob's original comment was correct. –  Crescent Fresh Feb 27 '09 at 20:33

As a slight (but related) asside, if you use a javascript library such as jquery (v1.3) to do your dom manipulation you can make use of live events whereby you set up a handler like:

 $("#myspan").live("click", function(){
  alert('hi');
});

and it will be applied to that selector at all times during any kind of jquery manipulation. For live events see: docs.jquery.com/events/live for jquery manipulation see: docs.jquery.com/manipulation

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Now, it is 2012, and jQuery has append and prepend functions that do exactly this, add content without effecting current content. Very useful.

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1  
.insertAdjacentHTML has been around since IE4 –  Esailija Jul 23 '12 at 13:47
    
@Esailija, that doesn't work in Firefox. –  Tynach Jun 29 at 22:52

I created my markup to insert as a string since it's less code and easier to read than working with the fancy dom stuff.

Then I made it innerHTML of a temporary element just so I could take the one and only child of that element and attach to the body.

var html = '<div>';
html += 'Hello div!';
html += '</div>';

var tempElement = document.createElement('div');
tempElement.innerHTML = html;
document.getElementsByTagName('body')[0].appendChild(tempElement.firstChild);
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Losing event handlers is, IMO, a bug in the way Javascript handles the DOM. To avoid this behavior, you can add the following:

function start () {
  myspan = document.getElementById("myspan");
  myspan.onclick = function() { alert ("hi"); };

  mydiv = document.getElementById("mydiv");
  clickHandler = mydiv.onclick;  // add
  mydiv.innerHTML += "bar";
  mydiv.onclick = clickHandler;  // add
}
share|improve this answer
1  
I don't consider this a bug. Replacing an element means you completely replace it. It should not inherit what was there before. –  Diodeus Feb 27 '09 at 17:51
    
But I don't want to replace an element; I just want to append new ones to the parent. –  mike Feb 27 '09 at 17:53
    
If you were replacing the element, I would agree, @Diodeus. It's not the .innerHTML that has the event handler, but the .innerHtml's parent. –  Yes - that Jake. Feb 27 '09 at 17:57
    
The innerHTML's owner does not lose handlers when its innerHTML is changed, only anything in its contents. And JavaScript doesn't know that you are only appending new children, since “x.innerHTML+= y” is only syntactical sugar for the string operation “x.innerHTML= x.innerHTML+y”. –  bobince Feb 27 '09 at 18:16
    
You don't need to re-attach mydiv.onclick. Only the inner span's onclick is overridden by innerHTML +=. –  Crescent Fresh Feb 27 '09 at 20:35

I'm a lazy programmer. I don't use DOM because it seems like extra typing. To me, the less code the better. Here's how I would add "bar" without replacing "foo":

function start(){
var innermyspan = document.getElementById("myspan").innerHTML;
document.getElementById("myspan").innerHTML=innermyspan+"bar";
}
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4  
This question is asking how to do this without losing event handlers, so your answer is not relevant, and btw this is what += does, which is way shorter –  wlf Nov 23 '12 at 10:45

You could do it like this:

var anchors = document.getElementsByTagName('a'); 
var index_a = 0;
var uls = document.getElementsByTagName('UL'); 
window.onload=function()          {alert(anchors.length);};
for(var i=0 ; i<uls.length;  i++)
{
    lis = uls[i].getElementsByTagName('LI');
    for(var j=0 ;j<lis.length;j++)
    {
        var first = lis[j].innerHTML; 
        string = "<img src=\"http://g.etfv.co/" +  anchors[index_a++] + 
            "\"  width=\"32\" 
        height=\"32\" />   " + first;
        lis[j].innerHTML = string;
    }
}
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easiest way is actually to use [ your selector ].innerHTML+= random_blob.

"+=" operator will append to your current selected DOM item.

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4  
This question is asking how to do this avoid loss of event handlers, so your answer is not relevant. –  Luke Page Jul 5 '12 at 5:03

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