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I have a Python 2.x module.py file that looks like this:

class A(object):
    KEYWORD = 'Class A'

class B(A):
    KEYWORD = 'Class B'

class C(object):
    pass

def list_class_keywords():
    for name in globals():
        print name, hasattr(name, 'KEYWORD')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    list_class_keywords()

In list_class_keywords(), I'm looping through all of the objects of this file module and testing if the object has an attribute KEYWORD. Clearly it isn't working, since name is a string. How should I rewrite list_classes to get what I'm looking for?


Update: thanks to Ignacio for the hint. Here is the updated code:

def list_class_keywords():
    global_dict = globals()
    for name in global_dict:
        obj = global_dict[name]
        print name, hasattr(obj, 'KEYWORD')
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3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted
class A(object):
    KEYWORD = 'Class A'

class B(A):
    KEYWORD = 'Class B'

class C(object):
    pass

def list_class_keywords():
    for name, obj in globals().items():
        print name, hasattr(obj, 'KEYWORD')

if __name__ == '__main__':
    list_class_keywords()    
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globals() is a dictionary. Index it.

But you should be using a decorator to enumerate the classes.

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It's a bit hacky, but you can eval() a string that is a name, and it will get an object with that name. If that happens to be a class, then it should work.

Test:

>>>> class Object:
....     pass
.... 
>>>> eval("Object")
<class __main__.Object at 0x0000000102a62bc0>
>>>> 

UPDATE: The other answer is much better.

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