Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.
using System;
using System.Threading;

internal class TimerQueueTimer : IDisposable
{
    public TimerQueueTimer(int interval, int msBeforeFirstCall)
    {
        this.interval = interval;
        this.msBeforeFirstCall = msBeforeFirstCall;
        this.callback = this.ticked;
        this.isTheFirstTick = true;
        this.isStopped = true;
    }

    public event EventHandler Ticked;

    public void Start()
    {
        if (!this.isStopped)
        {
            return;
        }

        this.isTheFirstTick = true;
        this.isStopped = false;
        Computer.ChangeTimerResolutionTo(1);
        NativeMethods.CreateTimerQueueTimer(
            out this.handle,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            this.callback,
            IntPtr.Zero,
            (uint)this.msBeforeFirstCall,
            (uint)this.interval,
            CallbackExecution.ExecuteInTimerThread);
    }

    public void Stop()
    {
        if (this.isStopped)
        {
            return;
        }

        NativeMethods.DeleteTimerQueueTimer(
            IntPtr.Zero,
            this.handle,
            IntPtr.Zero);
        Computer.ClearTimerResolutionChangeTo(1);
        this.isStopped = true;
    }

    public void Dispose()
    {
        this.Stop();
    }

    private void ticked(IntPtr parameterPointer, bool timerOrWaitFired)
    {
        if (this.isStopped)
        {
            return;
        }

        if (this.isTheFirstTick)
        {
            Thread.CurrentThread.Priority = ThreadPriority.Highest;
        }

        this.isTheFirstTick = false;
        var ticked = this.Ticked;
        if (ticked != null)
        {
            ticked(this, EventArgs.Empty);
        }
    }

    private IntPtr handle;
    private volatile bool isStopped;
    private volatile bool isTheFirstTick;
    private readonly WaitOrTimerDelegate callback;
    private readonly int interval;
    private readonly int msBeforeFirstCall;
}

(Note: Computer.ChangeTimerResolutionTo() and Computer.ClearTimerResolutionChangeTo() call timeBeginPeriod and timeEndPeriod, respectively.)

Questions:

  1. The callback is running in the timer's thread, rather than a ThreadPool thread. This is fine as long as the callback function is fast, right?
  2. Does setting the callback thread (and thus the timer thread) priority to Highest do anything in terms of performance?
  3. Would it be better to make the timer interval 1ms and count ticks, raising Ticked if tickCount % interval == 0? Is a lower interval timer more accurate and precise?
  4. Is there any reason this might be less accurate and/or precise than a similarly created timeSetEvent timer?

The reason I ask is because we are running into issues with the timer callback occasionally being delayed for up to ~50ms when the system is under heavy load. Compared to when we were previously using timeSetEvent it felt like this happened less often--though that might be just an illusion. I do know that Windows isn't deterministic, so there's only so much I can do. However, I want to make sure I've done all I can do to make this as high-priority as possible. Is there anything else I can do?

share|improve this question
1  
Just FYI: checking whether ticked == null first, only to invoke the Ticked event directly, is not really the best move. Typically the whole point of the local variable is to avoid a race condition. –  Dan Tao May 11 '11 at 7:04
    
Whoops, thanks Dan. –  Sam Pearson May 11 '11 at 8:44

1 Answer 1

I used priority queue to solve this problem: each element of the queue contains callback address (the timer routine), pointer to callback parameters and time in future when it should be fired.

The 'time' is the priority, the logic here is to have possibility to wake up the timer thread from another thread. When callback is added to the queue by another thread the timer thread will waken up and it look for the top element of priority queue, calculates the different between current time and 'time' stored in the queue and sleeps until calculated timeout exceeds.

When the timer thread is awaken by timeout it starts new thread from thread pool which invokes callback.

I have a timer queue implementation here, it is not well tested but you can see if it helps.

share|improve this answer
    
@ruffp I have added more details, looks good? –  Anu Thomas Chandy Jan 28 '14 at 19:12
    
@ruffp would be great if you can remove -ve point if you think i solved your concern :) –  Anu Thomas Chandy Jan 28 '14 at 19:18
    
I reviewed the flag "low quality post" and by choosing recommmend close as link only, it put this comment. But it was not me who downvote. Anyway your answer looks better now (even it needs better formatting), I can remove my comment. –  ruffp Jan 28 '14 at 22:53
    
Thanks @ruffp for editing and making the answer more readable. Going forward I will ensure to put clear answers. –  Anu Thomas Chandy Jan 28 '14 at 23:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.