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To describe clearly what I mean, I just give an example here:

function y = f(x,a)
global a
y = f1(x);

function y = f1(x)
global a
y = x + a;

Here, I want the variable 'a' to be used as a global variable that can be called by the subfunction 'f1' to compute $x+a$. (My purpose is to reduce the transformation of parameters)

But this function does not work, unless I define a new variable 'b' to restore the value of 'a'.

The question is, how can I make 'a' a global variable directly, without defining a new variable?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would not recommend you to use global variables, especially since you pass a into the function f.

The behavior you want can be obtained without global variables, but using nested functions:

function y = f(x,a)
y = f1(x);
   function y = f1(x)
   y = x + a;
   end
end
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You can try

a=evalin('base','a');

to get the value of a from the base workspace. Global variables are generally discouraged.

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With all due respect, that's even worse than just global variables. eval, evalin and assignin should only be used when no other options are feasible. Your solution will work, but the code will be a lot harder to maintain. –  Egon May 11 '11 at 21:18
    
Yes, I agree in principle. At some level the OP need to pass the value of a to the function. My preference would be to pass it explicitly. –  mor22 May 12 '11 at 11:45

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