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I want to label 3 DIVs, then I write the following code, but it doesn't work:

<table>
<tr>
  <td>
    <tr><div id="leftUpDiv" style="width:20%;height:50%;border:1px solid gray"></div></tr>
    <tr><div id="leftDownDiv" style="width:20%;height:50%;border:1px solid gray"></div></tr>
  </td>
  <td>
    <div id="rightDiv" style="width:80%;height:100%;border:1px solid gray"></div>
  </td>
</tr>
</table>

But if I change the percentages into numbers (20% -> 200; 50% -> 500; 80% -> 800; 100% -> 1000), it works.

My question is: How to change the code, so the Divs can labeled with the above percentages?

share|improve this question
    
try putting in a &nbsp; in the div's inner text area... –  Naveed Butt May 11 '11 at 6:44
    
Do you really need the tables in the first place ? If not ditch them altogether and use css. –  Krimo May 11 '11 at 7:08
    
@Naveed Butt: it doesn't work. –  pengdu May 11 '11 at 7:08
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1 Answer

div's will by default use 100% width, and 100% height of whatever content is in there. If nothing in there, then height of 100% = 0px. Also should fix your formatting of your table. It shouldn't even work that way.

CSS:

td{
border:1px solid red;
}

HTML:

<table>
<tr>
    <td><div id="leftUpDiv"></div></td>
    <td><div id="leftDownDiv"></div></td>
</tr>
<tr>
  <td colspan="2">
    <div id="rightDiv"></div>
  </td>
</tr>
</table>
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks! But if my requirement is that: even if nothing in DIV, it should also occupy that percentage of screen. BTW, the contents of DIV will be filled later via javascript. –  pengdu May 11 '11 at 7:07
    
then you'd have to style the table, td to take 100% width, a height, and then style the div to take up whatever height you set the table to be. –  robx May 11 '11 at 14:22
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