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I am using shared preference in my android app. I am using both commit() and apply() method from shared preference. When I use AVD 2.3 it shows no error, but when I run the code in AVD 2.1, apply() method shows error. SO what's the difference between these two? And by using only commit() can I store the preference value without any problem?

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This is a year old, but I'm going to comment on it anyway, although it may be obvious, none of the answers make this point: apply() will asynchronously do disk I/O while commit() is synchronous. So you really shouldn't call commit() from the UI thread. –  spacemanaki Jun 18 '12 at 19:45

6 Answers 6

up vote 70 down vote accepted

apply() was added in 2.3, it commits without returning a boolean indicating success or failure.

commit() returns true if the save works, false otherwise.

apply() was added as the android dev team noticed that most no one took notice of the return value, so apply is faster as it asynchronous.

http://developer.android.com/reference/android/content/SharedPreferences.Editor.html#apply()

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Thanks. This is what I was looking for. –  Andro Selva May 11 '11 at 7:44
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This answer is true but I guess the @spacemanaki 's comment above is also true contains valuable information –  flock.dux Nov 8 '13 at 10:24

Use apply().

It writes the changes to the RAM immediately and waits and writes it to the internal storage(the actual preference file) after. Commit writes the changes synchronously and directly to the file.

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I'm experiencing some problems using apply() instead commit(). As stated before in other responses, the apply() is asynchronous. I'm getting the problem that the changes formed to a "string set" preference are never written to the persistent memory.

It happens if you "force detention" of the program or, in the ROM that I have installed on my device with Android 4.1, when the process is killed by the system due to memory necessities.

I recommend to use "commit()" instead "apply()" if you want your preferences alive.

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Are you sure your problem is not related due to concurrent threading? After you send apply(), you have to wait a while to read the things you added, otherwise the UI thread will attempt to read before the worker thread of apply() commited the changes. –  Marco Altran Aug 21 at 5:11

From the SharedPreferences.Editor Documentation:

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself.

As SharedPreferences instances are singletons within a process, it's safe to replace any instance of commit() with apply() if you were already ignoring the return value.

The SharedPreferences.Editor interface isn't expected to be implemented directly. However, if you previously did implement it and are now getting errors about missing apply(), you can simply call commit() from apply().

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The docs give pretty good explanation what is the difference between apply() and commit().

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself. As SharedPreferences instances are singletons within a process, it's safe to replace any instance of commit() with apply() if you were already ignoring the return value.

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From javadoc:

Unlike commit(), which writes its preferences out to persistent storage synchronously, apply() commits its changes to the in-memory SharedPreferences immediately but starts an asynchronous commit to disk and you won't be notified of any failures. If another editor on this SharedPreferences does a regular commit() while a > apply() is still outstanding, the commit() will block until all async commits are completed as well as the commit itself

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