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Before this question is marked as duplicate, please read it. ;) There are already several questions about coverage tools and such, however this is a bit different than the usual ones (I hope).

According to wikipedia there are several different kind of 'coverage' variations that affect several different aspects of the term 'coverage'.

Here a little example:

public class Dummy {
    public int a = 0;
    public int b = 0;
    public int c = 0;

    public void doSomething() {
        a += 5;

        b += 5;

        c = b + 5;
    }
}

public class DummyTest {

    @Test
    public void testDoSomething() {
        Dummy dummy = new Dummy();

        dummy.doSomething();

        assertEquals( 10, dummy.c );
    }
}

As you can see, the test will have a coverage of 100% lines, the assertion on the value of field 'c' will cover this field and indirectly also cover field 'b', however there is no assertion coverage on field 'a'. This means that the test covers 100% of the code lines and assures that c contains the expected value and most probably also b contains the correct one, however a is not asserted at all and may a completely wrong value.

So... now the question: Is there a tool able to analyze the (java) code and create a report about which fields/variables/whatever have not been (directly and/or indirectly) covered by an assertion?

(ok when using getters instead of public fields you would see that getA() is not called, but well this is not the answer I'd like to hear ;) )

share|improve this question
    
So… you're looking for some kind of tool to do coverage of information flow? That would actually be useful, though I don't know of any offhand. Have a +1. – Donal Fellows May 11 '11 at 8:34
    
yeah, since I am lazy ;) I'd like something that says me, hey you forgot to test the value of field XY in class YZ. – Danilo Tommasina May 11 '11 at 8:52
up vote 2 down vote accepted

As you can see, the test will have a coverage of 100% lines, the assertion on the value of field 'c' will cover this field and indirectly also cover field 'b', however there is no assertion coverage on field 'a'. This means that the test covers 100% of the code lines and assures that c contains the expected value and most probably also b contains the correct one, however a is not asserted at all and may a completely wrong value.

Well, "cover" unfortunately means different things to different people... This test indeed exercises 100% of the code lines, but it does not test them all.

What you're looking for is handled well by mutation testing.

Have a look at Jester, which uses mutation testing to report on code coverage.

share|improve this answer
    
If there's something here deserving of a downvote, I'd appreciate knowing what it is. – Don Roby May 11 '11 at 13:33
    
perhaps you have any personal enemies here? I did not find anything to object, so I consider the downvote also unfair. I'll make it good with an upvote of mine. – Ingo May 11 '11 at 14:09
    
Voted up, thanks for the information this looks already very interesting and goes into the direction of what I was looking for. Many thanks. I'll still not mark it as answered just to see what input will still come in. – Danilo Tommasina May 12 '11 at 6:17

There are hundreds of definition of "test coverage", of which the COTS tools only handle a very few at best. (My company builds test coverage tools so we track this kind of thing). See this lecture on test coverage for an interesting overview.

The closest definition I have heard is one for data coverage; depending on your definition :-{ it tells you that each data item has been written and read during execution. The lecture talks about verifying that every write and every read has been exercised as a special case.

I don't know the hundreds of definitions by heart, but you may have invented yet one more: data coverage restricted to assertions.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for the informative input, I guess my question is still too vague... It shouldn't be restricted to 'assertions', it was my terminology to say that actual values are verified against an expected value. The tool should give a useful info about internal states/fields/return values that were 'used' in a test, but whose actual values have not been verified against an expected value. pppf... sounds quite complicated, hopefully it is understandable... – Danilo Tommasina May 12 '11 at 6:29
    
If you are only concerned about which states/fields/values were "used" in a test, then you want data coverage. ... All test coverage tools are complicated; you want to extract information about what happens without breaking the code and without a lot of work. Fundamentally you need instrumentation to collect the data of interest; that insrutmentation must be modest cost to run and not break the program function, and something has to interpret the results. No, I don't think you are going to find such a tool off-the-shelf. Is this just a wish, or is a fundamental requirement for your task? – Ira Baxter May 12 '11 at 17:05
    
It's a wish, the idea came while writing a unit test and checking it's coverage in terms of executed lines of code. After searching around a bit I didn't find anything matching my idea and I was just wondering if somebody already did the job ;) Thanks for feedback. – Danilo Tommasina May 13 '11 at 7:22

please go through this link below

Compatibility Test Tools

share|improve this answer
    
mmh, thanks for the link. If I understand it correctly the spec trac tool will check the 'coverage' of how many 'JDK asserts' are gone through by unit tests. My question however is if there is a tool that will help find if there are missing assertions on some fields that get modified during tests. – Danilo Tommasina May 11 '11 at 8:32

there are Assertions in Java if that is what you are looking for.

To see how much code has been covered there are tools that you can use here are some examples: cobertura clover

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