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I've got code that looks like this:

for (std::list<item*>::iterator i=items.begin();i!=items.end();i++)
{
    bool isActive = (*i)->update();
    //if (!isActive) 
    //  items.remove(*i); 
    //else
       other_code_involving(*i);
}
items.remove_if(CheckItemNotActive);

I'd like remove inactive items immediately after update them, inorder to avoid walking the list again. But if I add the commented-out lines, I get an error when I get to i++: "List iterator not incrementable". I tried some alternates which didn't increment in the for statement, but I couldn't get anything to work.

What's the best way to remove items as you are walking a std::list?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 117 down vote accepted

You have to increment the iterator first (with i++) and then remove the previous element (e.g., by using the returned value from i++). You can change the code to a while loop like so:

std::list<item*>::iterator i = items.begin();
while (i != items.end())
{
    bool isActive = (*i)->update();
    if (!isActive)
    {
        items.erase(i++);  // alternatively, i = items.erase(i);
    }
    else
    {
        other_code_involving(*i);
        ++i;
    }
}
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2  
Actually, that's not guaranteed to work. With "erase(i++);", we only know that the pre-incremented value is passed to erase(), and the i is incremented before the semi-colon, not necessarily before the call to erase(). "iterator prev = i++; erase(prev);" is sure to work, as is use the return value –  James Curran Feb 27 '09 at 20:03
19  
No James, i is incremented before calling erase, and the previous value is passed to the function. A function's arguments have to be fully evaluated before the function is called. –  Brian Neal Feb 27 '09 at 20:07
16  
@ James Curran: That's not correct. ALL arguments are fully evaluated before a function is called. –  Loki Astari Feb 28 '09 at 0:59
4  
Martin York is correct. All arguments to a function call are fully evaluated before a function is called, no exceptions. That is simply how function work. And it has nothing to do with your foo.b(i++).c(i++) example (which is undefined in any case) –  jalf Feb 28 '09 at 15:59
15  
The alternate usage i = items.erase(i) is safer, because it's equivalent for a list, but will still work if someone changes the container to a vector. With a vector, erase() moves everything to the left to fill the hole. If you try to remove the last item with code that increments the iterator after erasing, the end moves to the left, and the iterator moves to the right-- past the end. And then you crash. –  Eric Seppanen May 2 '12 at 23:55

You want to do:

i= items.erase(i);

That will correctly update the iterator to point to the location after the iterator you removed.

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32  
Be warned that you can't just drop that code into your for-loop. Otherwise you'll skip an element every time you remove one. –  Michael Kristofik Feb 27 '09 at 19:39
1  
can he not do i--; each time following his piece of code to avoid skipping? –  enthusiasticgeek Mar 19 '12 at 15:58
1  
@enthusiasticgeek, what happens if i==items.begin()? –  MSN Mar 19 '12 at 18:36
1  
@enthusiasticgeek, at that point you should just do i= items.erase(i);. It's the canonical form and takes care of all those details already. –  MSN Mar 20 '12 at 4:18
2  
Michael points out a huge 'gotcha', I had to deal with the same thing just now. Easiest method of avoiding it that I found was just decomposing the for() loop into a while() and being careful with the incrementing –  Clairvoire Jan 14 at 11:49

You need to do the combination of Kristo's answer and MSN's:

// Note: Using the pre-increment operator is preferred for iterators because
//       there can be a performance gain.
//
// Note: As long as you are iterating from beginning to end, without inserting
//       along the way you can safely save end once; otherwise get it at the
//       top of each loop.

std::list< item * >::iterator iter = items.begin();
std::list< item * >::iterator end  = items.end();

while (iter != items.end())
{
    item * pItem = *iter;

    if (pItem->update() == true)
    {
        other_code_involving(pItem);
        ++iter;
    }
    else
    {
        // BTW, who is deleting pItem, a.k.a. (*iter)?
        iter = items.erase(iter);
    }
}

Of course, the most efficient and SuperCool® STL savy thing would be something like this:

// This implementation of update executes other_code_involving(Item *) if
// this instance needs updating.
//
// This method returns true if this still needs future updates.
//
bool Item::update(void)
{
    if (m_needsUpdates == true)
    {
        m_needsUpdates = other_code_involving(this);
    }

    return (m_needsUpdates);
}

// This call does everything the previous loop did!!! (Including the fact
// that it isn't deleting the items that are erased!)
items.remove_if(std::not1(std::mem_fun(&Item::update)));
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I did consider your SuperCool method, my hesitation was that the call to remove_if does not make it clear that the goal is to process the items, rather than remove them from the list of active ones. (The items aren't being deleted because they are only becoming inactive, not unneeded) –  AShelly Feb 27 '09 at 22:40
    
I suppose you are right. On one hand I'm inclined to suggest changing the name of 'update' to remove the obscurity, but the truth is, this code is fancy with the functors, but it is also anything but non-obscure. –  Mike Mar 2 '09 at 0:35

Use std::remove_if algorithm.

Edit: Work with collections should be like: 1. prepare collection. 2. process collection.

Life will be easier if you won't mix this steps.

  1. std::remove_if. or list::remove_if ( if you know that you work with list and not with the TCollection )
  2. std::for_each
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std::list has a remove_if member function which is more efficient than the remove_if algorithm (and doesn't require the "remove-erase" idiom). –  Brian Neal Feb 27 '09 at 20:03

Removal invalidates only the iterators that point to the elements that are removed.

So in this case after removing *i , i is invalidated and you cannot do increment on it.

What you can do is first save the iterator of element that is to be removed , then increment the iterator and then remove the saved one.

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2  
Using post-increment is far more elegant. –  Brian Neal Feb 27 '09 at 20:05

The alternative for loop version to Kristo's answer.

You lose some efficiency, you go backwards and then forward again when deleting but in exchange for the extra iterator increment you can have the iterator declared in the loop scope and the code looking a bit cleaner. What to choose depends on priorities of the moment.

The answer was totally out of time, I know...

typedef std::list<item*>::iterator item_iterator;

for(item_iterator i = items.begin(); i != items.end(); ++i)
{
    bool isActive = (*i)->update();

    if (!isActive)
    {
        items.erase(i--); 
    }
    else
    {
        other_code_involving(*i);
    }
}
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1  
That's what I've used, too. But I'm not sure if it's guaranteed to work if the element to be removed is the first element in the container. For me, it works, I think, but I'm not sure if it's portable across platforms. –  trololo Feb 10 '13 at 18:12
    
I didn't do "-1", however, list iterator can not decrement? At least I've got assertion from Visual Studio 2008. –  milesma Jul 26 '13 at 3:52
    
As long as the linked list is implemented as a circular double linked list having a head/stub node (used as end() rbegin() and when empty used as begin() and rend() too) this will work. I can't remember in which platform I was using this, but it was working for me too, as the implementation named above is the most common implementation for a std::list. But anyways, it's almost sure that this was exploiting some undefined (by the C++ standard) behavior, so better don't use it. –  Rafael Gago Mar 26 at 15:36

Here's an example using a for loop that iterates the list and increments or revalidates the iterator in the event of an item being removed during traversal of the list.

for(auto i = items.begin(); i != items.end();)
{
    if(bool isActive = (*i)->update())
    {
        other_code_involving(*i);
        ++i;

    }
    else
    {
        i = items.erase(i);

    }

}

items.remove_if(CheckItemNotActive);
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I think you have a bug there, I code this way:

for (std::list<CAudioChannel *>::iterator itAudioChannel = audioChannels.begin();
             itAudioChannel != audioChannels.end(); )
{
    CAudioChannel *audioChannel = *itAudioChannel;
    std::list<CAudioChannel *>::iterator itCurrentAudioChannel = itAudioChannel;
    itAudioChannel++;

    if (audioChannel->destroyMe)
    {
        audioChannels.erase(itCurrentAudioChannel);
        delete audioChannel;
        continue;
    }
    audioChannel->Mix(outBuffer, numSamples);
}
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