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I recently encountered problems with memory allocations made in one DLL (or *.so - portable code) and deallocation done in another DLL. The errors I encountered so far are:

  • It just doesn't work - fails an assert() on debug.
  • It doesn't work if one DLL was statically linked with the standard C library and the other DLL dynamically linked with it.
  • It doesn't work if one DLL does an allocation then the DLL is unloaded and another DLL tries to deallocate this memory.

Basically the rule I decided I should follow is not to make allocations in one DLL and release it in another (and preferably keep it within one cpp file). This usually also means I shouldn't do allocations in a header file that may be shared by more than one DLLs. This means I shouldn't do allocations in tempaltes (since they are all in header) and this is quite a big limitation.

When I do need to create a new object in a template what I do now is allocate the memory for it a cpp file and only then run its c'tor with placement new operator.

// header
class MyBase
{
public:
  static void* allocate(std::size_t i_size);
};

template <typename T>
class MyClass: MyBase
{
public:
  T* createT();
};

temlpate <typename T>
T* MyClass<T>::createT()
{
  void* pMem = MyBase::allocate( sizeof(T) );
  return new (pMem) T;
}

// Cpp file
void* MyBase::allocate(std::size_t i_size)
{
  return malloc( i_size );
}

While this works, this is a bit ugly. It means writing template code without using new.

Another implication is that if you don't know that a template was written using this technique you should only use const methods of it in a header file (including other templates) (this is assuming const methods don't allocate or deallocate memory). This includes STL. In fact, one of the places I encountered this was in a vector that was resized by one dynamic library (on HP-UX) then unloaded than its d'tor was called by another dynamic library.

Is there some widely known solution for this that I'm just missing or is it just an overlooked problem?

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"It doesn't work" is NOT an error description. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 '11 at 9:14
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: Debug versions fail on an assert(). Release version sometime fail on SIGSEGV. –  selalerer May 11 '11 at 11:02
    
Right, so post a backtrace from a SIGSEGV, and the text of the assertion failure. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 '11 at 11:46
    
the problem is solved in boost::shared_ptrs somehow; maybe u should take a look at their implementation –  Alsk May 11 '11 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

Basically the rule I decided I should follow is not to make allocations in one DLL and release it in another (and preferably keep it within one cpp file). This usually also means I shouldn't do allocations in a header file that may be shared by more than one DLLs.

No, the one does not imply the other.

If your allocation and de-allocation functions are templates in a header, that's still fine; just ensure that you restrict use of these functions for any given object to one TU1.

Encapsulate your objects such that it would be invalid/prohibited/undefined for code in a DLL 1 to call these functions on objects from DLL 2. Make it a contract to the user, write it in comments that ownership of objects remains with the original allocating context, then move on to the next part of your project without ever having to worry about this again.

That the functions are available to all TUs is not relevant; after all, you can always attempt delete on these things!


1 - Translation Unit. Roughly equivalent to one pre-processed .cpp file.

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@Tomalak Geret'kal - can you demonstrate "Encapsulate your objects such that it would be invalid/prohibited/undefined for code in a DLL 1 to call these functions on objects from DLL 2" ? –  selalerer May 11 '11 at 9:50
    
@selalerer: Read the second sentence of that same paragraph. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 '11 at 9:52
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal - In the projects you work on, do all relevant classes have such documentation? Or do all people in the project know this is an implicit limitation to all classes unless otherwise specified? –  selalerer May 11 '11 at 10:46
    
@selalerer: It's documented. Functions without such documentation have ambiguous ownership of objects, and are suspect. They're the ones you have to spend time unravelling and, perhaps, refactoring. –  Lightness Races in Orbit May 11 '11 at 10:48
    
@Tomalak Geret'kal: I think a solution in documentation is a bit problematic. I'm working in a project that had and still have many developers, not all of them are trust worthy enough for me to count on them reading the comments, understanding it and following it to the letter. Thanks for confirming the problem exists. I think I'll keep fishing for a solution I'll feel more comfortable with. –  selalerer May 11 '11 at 10:56

You must dynamically link both DLLs to the same dynamic CRT library. The CRT will not be unloaded until all DLLs that reference it have been unloaded, and when the same CRT DLL is used, then it is safe to allocate memory in one and free it in another.

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I think this information is correct specifically for Windows but not necessarily for other OS+arch combination. –  selalerer May 11 '11 at 10:48

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