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I'm studing CouchDB and I'm picturing a worst case scenario:

for each document type I need 3 view and this application can generate 10 thousands of document types.

With "document type" I mean the structure of the document.

After insertion of a new document, couchdb make 3*10K calls to view functions searching for right document type.

Is this true? Is there a smart solution than make a database for each doc type?

Document example (assume that none documents have the same structure, in this example data is under different keys):

[
     {
       "_id":"1251888780.0",
       "_rev":"1-582726400f3c9437259adef7888cbac0"
       "type":'sensorX',
       "value":{"ValueA":"123"}
     },
     {
       "_id":"1251888780.0",
       "_rev":"1-37259adef7888cbac06400f3c9458272"
       "type":'sensorY',
       "value":{"valueB":"456"}
     },
     {
       "_id":"1251888780.0",
       "_rev":"1-6400f3c945827237259adef7888cbac0"
       "type":'sensorZ',
       "value":{"valueC":"789"}
     },
   ]

Views example (in this example only one per doc type)

  "views":
  {
    "sensorX": {
      "map": "function(doc) { if (doc.type == 'sensorX')  emit(null, doc.valueA) }"
    },
    "sensorY": {
      "map": "function(doc) { if (doc.type == 'sensorY')  emit(null, doc.valueB) }"
    },
    "sensorZ": {
      "map": "function(doc) { if (doc.type == 'sensorZ')  emit(null, doc.valueC) }"
    },
  }
share|improve this question
    
Can you provide an example of what you mean by a document type? – Dominic Barnes May 11 '11 at 13:51
    
I think your "Document example" does not contains documents, but the result of a view. Can you post some sample documents? You can find them via Futon. – Marcello Nuccio May 11 '11 at 15:35
up vote 5 down vote accepted

The results of the map() function in CouchDB is cached the first time you request the view for each new document. Let me explain with a quick illustration.

  • You insert 100 documents to CouchDB

  • You request the view. Now the 100 documents have the map() function run against them and the results cached.

  • You request the view again. The data is read from the indexed view data, no documents have to be re-mapped.

  • You insert 50 more documents

  • You request the view. The 50 new documents are mapped and merged into the index with the old 100 documents.

  • You request the view again. The data is read from the indexed view data, no documents have to be re-mapped.

I hope that makes sense. If you're concerned about a big load being generated when a user requests a view and lots of new documents have been added you could look at having your import process call the view (to re-map the new documents) and have the user request for the view include stale=ok.

The CouchDB book is a really good resource for information on CouchDB.

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, i now that CouchDB cache view results, my doubt is if I have in _design documents thousands of view functions. – fdb May 11 '11 at 15:57
    
I think you need to rethink how you intend to use CouchDB. Having thousands of view function is almost certainly a bad plan. I would suggest you modify your view function so that it emits a key of [doc.type, doc.value]. You'll need to make sure that the view function includes the logic to work out with value to emit. – James C May 11 '11 at 21:53
    
The problem is that I don't know the logic to work with each doc type, it's user defined and the worst case is that each user have his own logic. Here's why my first idea was using views like "adapters" converting docs with unknown structure in docs with well known structure. What do you think about using one db for each data type? Can CouchDB handle thousands of DBs? – fdb May 12 '11 at 0:20
1  
yes CouchDB can handle millions of databases on a single server, but I would just have all the different data types in one db. it saves you from having to know what type they are when you create them. – J Chris A May 12 '11 at 0:37
1  
I suspect you'd start running into fs issues if you had thousands of databases. I'd recommend looking at other ways around the problem, perhaps normalising the data before it goes into CouchDb or perhaps rethinking the data model entirely. – James C May 12 '11 at 8:31

James has a great answer.

It looks like you are asking the question "what are the values of documents of type X?"

I think you can do that with one view:

function(doc) {
    // _view/sensor_value
    var val_names = { "sensorX": "valueA"
                    , "sensorY": "valueB"
                    , "sensorZ": "valueC"
                    };

    var value_name = val_names[doc.type];
    if(value_name) {
        // e.g. "sensorX" -> "123"
        // or "sensorZ" -> "789"
        emit(doc.type, doc.value[value_name]);
    }
}

Now, to get all values for sensorY, you query /db/_design/app/_view/sensor_value with a parameter ?key="sensorX". CouchDB will show all values for sensorX, which come from the document's value.valueA field. (For sensorY, it comes from value.valueB, etc.)

Future-proofing

If you might have new document types in the future, something more general might be better:

function(doc) {
     if(doc.type && doc.value) {
         emit(doc.type, doc.value);
     }
 }

That is very simple, and any document will work if it has a type and value field. Next, to get the valueA, valueB, etc. from the view, just do that on the client side.

If using the client is impossible, use a _list function.

function(head, req) {
    // _list/sensor_val
    //
    start({'headers':{'Content-Type':'application/json'}});

    // Updating this will *not* cause the map/reduce view to re-build.
    var val_names = { "sensorX": "valueA"
                    , "sensorY": "valueB"
                    , "sensorZ": "valueC"
                    };


    var row;
    var doc_type, val_name, doc_val;
    while(row = getRow()) {
        doc_type = row.key;
        val_name = val_names[doc_type];
        doc_val = row.value[val_name];
        send("Doc " + row.id + " is type " + doc_type + " and value " + doc_val);
    }
}

Obviously use send() to send whichever format you prefer for the client (such as JSON).

share|improve this answer
    
the drawback with this solution is when should be added a new doc type: the view should be rebuilt parsing all documents. – fdb May 24 '11 at 8:28
    
Updated the answer to consider unknown future doc types – JasonSmith May 25 '11 at 0:17

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