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I have a method like the following:

public void ExecuteSomeCommand()
{
    new MyCommand( someInt, SomeEnum.EnumValue ).Execute();
}

I'd like to test that the enum value that is passed in to the constructor of the ICommand object I'm creating is the correct value. Is there any way I can do this with Rhino.Mocks?

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Does the constructor throw an exception if the enum value is unexpected? –  MattDavey May 11 '11 at 10:37
    
The constructor itself doesn't throw. The arguments are passed by the Execute method to the view model of a view that is created via a NavigationManager class. The new view model then uses the enum for some display property and if it is an unexpected value, it throws. –  alimbada May 11 '11 at 10:51
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2 Answers

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Option 1: Use a Seam

The easiest way is to refactor that method with a seam:

public void ExecuteSomeCommand()
{
    this.CreateCommand(someInt, SomeEnum.EnumValue).Execute();
}

// Your seam
protected virtual ICommand CreateCommand(int someInt, 
    SomeEnum someEnum)
{
    return new MyCommand(someInt, SomeEnum.EnumValue);
}

This way you can intercept the creation of the 'new' operator by extending this class. When doing this by hand, it might look like this:

public FakeSomeService : SomeService
{
    public int SomeInt;
    public SomeEnum SomeEnum;

    protected override Command CreateCommand(int someInt, 
        SomeEnum someEnum)
    {
        this.SomeInt = someInt;
        this.SomeEnum = someEnum;
        return new FakeCommand();
    }

    private sealed class FakeCommand : Command
    {
        public override void Execute() { }
    }
}

This fake class can be used in your test methods.


Option 2: Separate behavior and data

A better way would be to separate the data from the behavior. You command has both data (the message) and the behavior (handling that message). If you are allowed to do such a change in your code base: separate this, for instance by defining commands and command handlers. Here is an example:

// Define an interface for handling commands
public interface IHandler<TCommand>
{
    void Handle(TCommand command);
}

// Define your specific command
public class MyCommand
{
    public int SomeInt;
    public SomeEnum SomeEnum;
}

// Define your handler for that command
public class MyCommandHandler : IHandler<MyCommand>
{
    public void Handle(MyCommand command)
    {
        // here your old execute logic
    }
}

Now you can use dependency injection to inject a handler into the class you wish to test. This class will now look like this:

public class SomeService
{
    private readonly IHandler<MyCommand> handler;

    // Inject a handler here using constructor injection.
    public SomeService(IHandler<MyCommand> handler)
    {
        this.handler = handler;
    }

    public void ExecuteSomeCommand()
    {
        this.handler.Handle(new MyCommand
        {
            SomeInt = someInt,
            SomeEnum = someEnum
        });
    }
}

Since you now separated the data from the behavior, it will be very easy to create a fake command handler (or create it using Rhino mocks) that checks if the correct command was sent to the handler. Manually this would look like this:

public class FakeHandler<TCommand> : IHandler<TCommand>
{
    public TCommand HandledCommand { get; set; }

    public void Handle(TCommand command)
    {
        this.HandledCommand = command;
    }
}

This fake handler can be reused throughout your unit testing project. A test using this FakeHandler could look like this:

[TestMethod]
public void SomeTestMethod()
{
    // Arrange
    int expected = 23;

    var handler = new FakeHandler<MyCommand>();

    var service = new SomeService(handler);

    // Act
    service.ExecuteSomeCommand();

    // Assert
    Assert.AreEqual(expected, handler.HandledCommand.SomeInt);
}

Separating the data from the behavior not only makes your application more testable. It makes your application more resilient to change. For instance, cross-cutting concerns can be added to the execution of commands, without the need to make changes to any handler in the system. Because the IHandler<T> is an interface with a single method, it is very easy to write a decorator that can wrap every handler and add things like logging, audit trailing, profiling, validation, transaction handling, fault tolerance improvents, etc. You can read more about it in this article.

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I went with your first suggestion. The fake class wasn't necessary though. I was able to use Rhino.Mocks' AssertWasCalled(...) to check the correct parameters were passed into the CreateCommand(...) method. Thanks! :-) –  alimbada May 11 '11 at 11:27
    
@Alimbada: Thanks. But don't forget about handlers. Think about how this can simplify your tests and your design. –  Steven May 11 '11 at 11:29
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None that I'm aware of. The closest thing that comes to my mind is to use a factory, then create a StrictMock of that factory. Something like that:

readonly ICommandFactory factory;

public Constructor(ICommandFactory factory)
{
    this.factory = factory;
}
public void ExecuteSomeCommand()
{
    factory.Create( someInt, SomeEnum.EnumValue ).Execute();
}

then, you can place expectations on invokation to Create().

HTH

share|improve this answer
    
You will probably need a command factory per specific command if you do this. In the case of the OP that class needs a IMyCommandFactory. This would probably be less ideal. Still +1 for using (constructor) dependency injection. –  Steven May 11 '11 at 11:07
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