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In the following snippet i am redirecting the output of the ls command to input of wc -l which works perfectly .Now i also want to redirect the output of ls command to a file named "beejoutput.txt" using the following code but its not working. Need help.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
int main(void)
{
  int pfds[2];
  pipe(pfds);
  if (!fork())
  {
    dup2(pfds[1],1);
    close(pfds[0]); 
    execlp("ls", "ls",NULL);
  }
  else
  {
    FILE *outputO=fopen ("beejoutput.txt", "w"); //opening file for writing

    dup2(pfds[0],0);
    dup2(fileno(outputO),pfds[0]); 
    close(pfds[1]); 
    execlp("wc", "wc","-l", NULL);
  }

  return 0;
}
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Why are you closing pfds[1] before execlp("wc")? –  weekens May 11 '11 at 10:29
    
Because that FD should not be passed to the wc command. –  Simon Richter May 11 '11 at 10:36
    
@weekens: because we dont want to write anything to the pipe.pfds[1] would be used to send data to the child process from the parent. –  scholar May 11 '11 at 10:37
    
Okay. Could you also comment 2 calls to dup2 after fopen? (I read the man, but still cannot catch.) Edit: especially the first one. –  weekens May 11 '11 at 10:42

3 Answers 3

The dup function duplicates a file descriptor, that is, both the old and new file descriptors refer to the same open file afterwards. That is different from having a single file descriptor refer to two different files at the same time.

If you want to send the same data to two different destinations, you need to spawn both commands in separate processes, and do the copying yourself, or spawn a copy of the "tee" command -- either way, you end up with three processes.

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what if i just want to send the data to the file and not to the wc -l .I am not able to send the data to even file alone –  scholar May 11 '11 at 10:43
    
dup2(fileno(outputO), 0); should do the right thing. –  Simon Richter May 11 '11 at 10:47
    
@Simon : doesn't works ..replaced dup2(pfds[0], 0); with dup2(fileno(outputO), 0); –  scholar May 11 '11 at 10:59
    
@scholar: replace dup2(fileno(outputO),pfds[0]); as dup2(fileno(output0),1) –  Prince John Wesley May 11 '11 at 11:04
    
@John: this will send the output of wc -l to the file .But i want to send the output of ls to file –  scholar May 11 '11 at 11:08

This worked for me :

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <unistd.h>
#include <fcntl.h>

int main(void)
{
    int pfds[2];
    pipe(pfds);

    pid_t childpid = fork();

    if (childpid == 0) {
        /* Child */
        dup2(pfds[1],1);
        close(pfds[0]); 

        execlp("ls", "ls",NULL);

    } else {
        /* Parent */

        pid_t retpid;
        int  child_stat;
        while ((retpid = waitpid(childpid, &child_stat, 0)) != childpid && retpid != (pid_t) -1)
            ;

        close(pfds[1]); 

        char buf[100];
        ssize_t bytesread;

        int fd = open("beejoutput.txt", O_CREAT | O_RDWR, S_IRUSR | S_IWUSR | S_IRGRP | S_IROTH);
        if (fd == -1) {
            fprintf(stderr, "Opening of beejoutput.txt failed!\n");
            exit(1);
        }

        /* This part writes to beejoutput.txt */
        while ((bytesread = read(pfds[0], buf, 100)) > 0) {
            write(fd, buf, bytesread);
        }

        lseek(fd, (off_t) 0, SEEK_SET);
        dup2(fd, 0);
        execlp("wc", "wc", "-l", NULL);
    }

    return 0;
}
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Try checking the result codes of all the system calls that you do (including dup2). This will possibly lead you to an answer. This is a good habbit, anyway.

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