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Can you give me an infinite loop example on c# with minimum code? I came up with something but I thought there could be more easier way.

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What have you tried? I have a feeling there will be 10 answers by the time I've posted this comment... –  Matt Ellen May 11 '11 at 10:52
    
You mean, like while(true){}? –  Andrew Barber May 11 '11 at 10:52
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I'm curious. What exactly did you come up with? –  Øyvind Knobloch-Bråthen May 11 '11 at 10:53
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@Cody: I thought about for(;;){} but for me it looks unnaturally because for(int i;.. itself is for looping with current position explicit state. So when no position is required, while(true) is more suitable. –  abatishchev May 11 '11 at 11:04
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@Cody Gray: I would hazard a guess that it's easier to remember the while construct because it's an actual English idiom (e.g. while I am here you do this) whereas there isn't a common idiom for for. –  Matt Ellen May 11 '11 at 11:12
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9 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The typical examples are the for and while loops. For example

for(;;)
{}

and

while(true)
{}

However, basically any looping construct without a break or a terminating condition will loop infinitely. Different developers have different opinions on which style is best. Additionally, context may sway which method you choose.

HTH

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while (true);

That should be enough.

The generated IL is:

IL_0000:  br.s        IL_0000

The code unconditionally transfers control to itself. A great way to waste CPU cycles.

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Infinite loop:

while (true)
{
    // do stuff
}

to break it:

while (true)
{
    if (condition)
        break;
}
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If you need a bit more obscurity, this might be what you are after:

for (;;) { }

Or even

l: goto l;
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In the spirit of Code Golf:

for(;;);
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Though not exactly an infinite loop, this will have the same practical effect and consume WAY less CPU. :)

System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(-1);
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Try this, an example of infinite loop.

while(true)
{

}
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For me, this thing worked out:

do
{
    //Something
} while (false);

My idea is to throw back to the point the program execution by continue; statements.

So using the infinite loop which will end only if it wasn't continue'd throughbody is my best option for that.

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Call a method within the same method and you have an infinite loop happening (Only conditions force you to break the loop)

void HelloWorld()
{
   HelloWorld();
}
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7  
This is not an infinite loop, this is infinite recursion, which will in most cases result in a StackOverflowException. –  Jaymz May 11 '11 at 10:58
3  
Well you assumed the OP wanted an example in the literal loops, by the way recursion is also a loop (maybe not in the context what you imagine now) –  V4Vendetta May 11 '11 at 11:00
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If tailoring occurs this will also run endless (but this depends on the compiler). –  Oliver May 11 '11 at 11:03
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@Adam: so something that goes around in a cycle isn't a loop? Interesting. Recursion isn't iteration, but it can be looping. This recursion is looping. –  Matt Ellen May 11 '11 at 12:56
1  
They might get terminated, but they don't terminate themselves. If left entirely to itself on stable hardware, an unconditional empty loop will indeed run forever. A recursive solution, on the other hand, sets up (and relies on!) the conditions that will eventually lead to its own failure, and thus can not continue forever, and thus can not be considered "infinite" by any stretch of the word's meaning. –  cHao May 12 '11 at 8:31
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