Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
class Test
  class << self
    attr_accessor :some

    def set_some
      puts self.inspect
      some = 'some_data'
    end
    def get_some
      puts self.inspect
      some
    end
  end
end

Test.set_some => Test
puts Test.get_some.inspect => Test nil

Here above I could find self as Test itself but not returning the some_data as output.

But while I modified in following way it returns expected output

class Test
  class << self
    attr_accessor :some

    def set_some
      puts self.inspect
      self.some = 'some_data'
    end
    def get_some
      puts self.inspect
      self.some
    end
  end
end

Test.set_some => Test
puts Test.get_some.inspect => Test some_data

What is the differences?

EDIT

Now in the first example if I set as get some method as

Test.some = 'new_data'
puts Test.some.inspect #=> new_data
Test.set_some
puts Test.get_some.inspect => new_data

Now it made me much more confused.

share|improve this question
    
some = 'some_data' in first example is only a local variable, assigning of instance variable should use self as receiver (as in second example) or with @ sign (like @some = 'some_data'). –  taro May 11 '11 at 11:00

5 Answers 5

some = :foo makes ruby think it should create a new local variable with name some. If you want to call some=(), you have to use an explicit reciever - as in self.some = :foo. I once lost a bet on that... :-/

share|improve this answer

It's (local) variable in the first example

share|improve this answer
    
I was also confused about this coming from the Java world... –  lzap May 11 '11 at 11:01

In the first example some is a local variable.

In the second one, some is a method of self. Why? Because attr_accessor :some is the same as:

def some= (val)
  @some = val
end

def some
  return @some
end

So, you have created the getter and setter methods for the instance variable @some (it's an instance variable of the object Test, as every class is also an object of class Class).

share|improve this answer
    
But in the first example I could set value for some as Test.some = 'new_data'. Which means some getter and setter method is class methods. Isn't it? –  kriysna May 12 '11 at 3:03

in the first method

def set_some
  puts self.inspect
  some = 'some_data'
end

some is a local variable.. its not the same as @some that is a instance variable (in this case a class instance variable) so the value disappears when the method ends.

if you want to call the setter method some or set @some to something then do this

@some = 'some_data'

or

self.some = 'some_data'

in the second method

def get_some
  puts self.inspect
  self.some
end

your calling the method some. which returns the instace variable @some.. and since at this point @some has no value.. returns nil..

share|improve this answer

Example 1 with no method override and no local variable

class Foo
  def initialize
    @foo = 'foo'
  end

  def print_foo
    print @foo
    print self.foo
    print foo
  end
end

@foo, self.foo, and foo will access instance variable @foo within the instance method:

Foo.new.print_foo #=> foofoofoo

Example 2 with method override

class Foo
  def initialize
    @foo = 'foo'
  end

  def foo
    return 'bar'
  end

  def print_foo
    print @foo
    print self.foo
    print foo
  end
end

@foo will access the instance variable, but self.foo and foo will call the foo override method:

Foo.new.print_foo #=> foobarbar

Example 3 with method override and local variable

class Foo
  def initialize
    @foo = 'foo'
  end

  def foo
    return 'bar'
  end

  def print_foo
    foo = 'baz'
    print @foo
    print self.foo
    print foo
  end
end

@foo accesses instance variable, self.foo accesses override method, and foo accesses local variable:

Foo.new.print_foo #=> foobarbaz

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.