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I used IPAddressUtil.isIPv6LiteralAddress (ipAddress) method to validate IPv6, but this method fails for ipv6-address/prefix-length format (format is mentioned in RFC 4291 section 2.3) of IPV6.

Could anyone know any validators which validate " ipv6-address/prefix-length " format?

Legal representations of IPV6

  1. ABCD:EF01:2345:6789:ABCD:EF01:2345:6789
  2. 2001:DB8:0:0:8:800:200C:417A
  3. FF01:0:0:0:0:0:0:101
  4. 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:1
  5. 0:0:0:0:0:0:0:0
  6. 2001:DB8::8:800:200C:417A
  7. FF01::101
  8. ::1
  9. ::
  10. 0:0:0:0:0:0:13.1.68.3
  11. 0:0:0:0:0:FFFF:129.144.52.38
  12. ::13.1.68.3
  13. FFFF:129.144.52.38
  14. 2001:0DB8:0000:CD30:0000:0000:0000:0000/60
  15. 2001:0DB8::CD30:0:0:0:0/60
  16. 2001:0DB8:0:CD30::/60

NOT legal representations of IPV6

  1. 2001:0DB8:0:CD3/60
  2. 2001:0DB8::CD30/60
  3. 2001:0DB8::CD3/60
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Can you give us an example of what you are trying to match? –  Ramhound May 11 '11 at 11:58
    
Sure, please see below ip address, 2001:0DB8:0000:CD30:0000:0000:0000:0000/60 –  Tony May 11 '11 at 11:59
2  
That format is for address prefixes, not addresses. –  EJP May 12 '11 at 0:19

5 Answers 5

You can use the Guava library, specifically using the com.google.common.net.InetAddresses class, calling isInetAddress().

http://guava-libraries.googlecode.com/svn/tags/release09/javadoc/com/google/common/net/InetAddresses.html

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See if this works:

try {
    if (subjectString.matches(
        "(?ix)\\A(?:                                                  # Anchor address\n" +
        " (?:  # Mixed\n" +
        "  (?:[A-F0-9]{1,4}:){6}                                # Non-compressed\n" +
        " |(?=(?:[A-F0-9]{0,4}:){2,6}                           # Compressed with 2 to 6 colons\n" +
        "     (?:[0-9]{1,3}\\.){3}[0-9]{1,3}                     #    and 4 bytes\n" +
        "     \\z)                                               #    and anchored\n" +
        "  (([0-9A-F]{1,4}:){1,5}|:)((:[0-9A-F]{1,4}){1,5}:|:)  #    and at most 1 double colon\n" +
        " |::(?:[A-F0-9]{1,4}:){5}                              # Compressed with 7 colons and 5 numbers\n" +
        " )\n" +
        " (?:(?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])\\.){3}  # 255.255.255.\n" +
        " (?:25[0-5]|2[0-4][0-9]|1[0-9][0-9]|[1-9]?[0-9])           # 255\n" +
        "|     # Standard\n" +
        " (?:[A-F0-9]{1,4}:){7}[A-F0-9]{1,4}                    # Standard\n" +
        "|     # Compressed\n" +
        " (?=(?:[A-F0-9]{0,4}:){0,7}[A-F0-9]{0,4}               # Compressed with at most 7 colons\n" +
        "    \\z)                                                #    and anchored\n" +
        " (([0-9A-F]{1,4}:){1,7}|:)((:[0-9A-F]{1,4}){1,7}|:)    #    and at most 1 double colon\n" +
        "|(?:[A-F0-9]{1,4}:){7}:|:(:[A-F0-9]{1,4}){7}           # Compressed with 8 colons\n" +
        ")/[A-F0-9]{0,4}\\z                                                    # Anchor address")) 
        {
        // String matched entirely
    } else {
        // Match attempt failed
    } 
} catch (PatternSyntaxException ex) {
    // Syntax error in the regular expression
}

I purchased a very helpful program called RegexMagic nearly a year ago for some complicated regular expressions I planned on using.

This was suppose to be Java, so it should compile, I assume the /60 can be between the ranges of 0000 and FFFF you can modify that last part.

/[A-F0-9]{0,4} is what I added to the regular expression to match your example.

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I took a quick look at the specification ( I am not network guy, and was taught about IPv4. It appears the /# is simply a decmial number, so 0000-FFFF wouldn't actually be correct. You could simply expand it to match 0-256. –  Ramhound May 11 '11 at 12:31
    
Thanks Ramhound, it is working for 2001:0DB8:0000:CD30:0000:0000:0000:0000/60. But not for other valid formats. I added valid and invalid ipv6 address in the question (sorry for the delay). Basically our validator should validate all valid ipv6 address formats. please visit tools.ietf.org/html/rfc4291 for ipv6 formats. –  Tony May 11 '11 at 12:34
    
the Regex above might work... but this is so ginormous, I can't imagine someone (including the original author) having a clue how to dissect it a year later. Instead of chaining so many |, I would break it into a bunch of "else if" statements, which at a minimum facilitates much easier debugging –  Mike Pennington May 11 '11 at 12:40
    
@Mike - It was actually generated by a tool which has the ability to explain each statement. A great deal is lost by simply having the regular expression without the comments and explaination. –  Ramhound May 11 '11 at 13:47
    
For IPv4, it is 0-32. For IPv6, it is 0-128. 32 or 128 would be a single address, 31 or 127 would be two addresses, 30 or 126 would be four addresses, etc. –  Gordon Jun 5 '11 at 0:22

Strictly speaking, a section 2.3 does not describe an address representation, but a representation of address prefix (even the "full-length" prefix is not the same as an address).

An IPv6 address prefix is represented by the notation: ipv6-address/prefix-length where ipv6-address is an IPv6 address in any of the notations listed in Section 2.2.

That means you may safely disregard this format if you need to validate addresses.

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My idea is to split it into two part, prefix address and prefix len.

1. validate prefix address use the some regex to validate IPv6 address
2. validate the prefix len that must be an integer
3. prefix address can only have ':' s less than the result ofprefix len divided by 16
4. other logic must be considered as well, leave TODOs here, sorry:(

  private int validateIPv6AddrWithPrefix(String address) {
        int occurCount = 0;
        for(char c : address) {
            if(c=='/'){
                occurCount++;
            }
        }
        if(occurCount != 1){
         //not good, to much / character
            return -1;
        }
        /* 2nd element should be an integer */
        String[] ss = pool.getAddress().split("/");
        Integer prefixLen = null;
        try{
            prefixLen = Integer.valueOf(ss[1]);
                    // TODO validate the prefix range(1, 128)

        }catch(NumberFormatException e) {
            /* not a Integer */
            return -1;
        }
        /* 1st element should be ipv6 address */
        if(!IPaddrUtilities.isIPv6Address(ss[0])) {
            return -1;
        }
        /* validate ':' character logic */
        occurCount = 0;
        for(char c : ss[0].toCharArray()){
            if(c==':') {
                occurCount++;
            }
        }
        if(occurCount >= prefixLen/16) {
            // to much ':' character
            return -1;
        }
        return 0;
    }
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I had tried below regex in java and it worked for IPV4 and IPV6

public class Utilities {
private static Pattern VALID_IPV4_PATTERN = null;
private static Pattern VALID_IPV6_PATTERN = null;
private static final String ipv4Pattern = "(([01]?\\d\\d?|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])\\.){3}([01]?\\d\\d?|2[0-4]\\d|25[0-5])";
private static final String ipv6Pattern = "([0-9a-f]{1,4}:){7}([0-9a-f]){1,4}";

static {
try {
  VALID_IPV4_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(ipv4Pattern, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
  VALID_IPV6_PATTERN = Pattern.compile(ipv6Pattern, Pattern.CASE_INSENSITIVE);
   } catch (PatternSyntaxException e) {
  //logger.severe("Unable to compile pattern", e);
 }
}

 /**
 * Determine if the given string is a valid IPv4 or IPv6 address.  This method
 * uses pattern matching to see if the given string could be a valid IP address.
 *
 * @param ipAddress A string that is to be examined to verify whether or not
 * it could be a valid IP address.
 * @return <code>true</code> if the string is a value that is a valid IP address,
 *  <code>false</code> otherwise.
 */
 public static boolean isIpAddress(String ipAddress) {

Matcher m1 = Utilities.VALID_IPV4_PATTERN.matcher(ipAddress);
if (m1.matches()) {
  return true;
}
Matcher m2 = Utilities.VALID_IPV6_PATTERN.matcher(ipAddress);
return m2.matches();
  }


}
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