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We have a list of elements and have a very simplistic collision detection where we check every object against every other object.

The check is commutative, so to avoid repeating it twice, we would do this in C++:

for (list<Object>::iterator it0 = list.begin(); it0 != list.end(); ++it0)
{
    for (list<Object>::iterator it1 = it0; it1 != list.end(); ++it1)
    {
        Test(*it0, *it1);
    }
}

The key bit here is the copy

it1 = it0

How would you write this in Java?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You cannot copy Java iterators, so you'll have to do it without them:

for(int i=0; i<list.size(); i++){
    for(int j=i; j<list.size(); j++){
        Test(list.get(i), list.get(j));
    }
}
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There's a Java type that supports .size() and element access via array-style subscripts? –  aroth May 11 '11 at 11:39
    
@aroth: good point, will fix that –  Michael Borgwardt May 11 '11 at 11:40
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You can do this with ListIterator:

for(ListIterator<O> outer = list.listIterator(); outer.hasNext() ; ) {
    O oVal = outer.next();
    for(ListIterator<O> inner = list.listIterator(outer.nextIndex()); inner.hasNext(); ) {
         Test(oVal, inner.next());
    }
}

For a linked list (which has slow index access) the list.listIterator(index) still needs to iterate to the right place, though. But this way it is only O(n²) (and you can't get better than this) instead of O(n³) like the index-access in the other answers then. (You might be even faster if you copy your list first to an array, but it is only a constant factor here.)

Of course, if you usually need index-based access (or this iterator-cloning), you would better use an array-based list (or a custom list whose iterator supports cloning).

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for(int i = 0; i < list.size(); i++) {
  for(int j = i; j < list.size(); j++){
    Test(list.get(i), list.get(j));
  }
}
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