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They seem to be doing the same thing... Is one modern and one old? Or are they supported by different browsers?

When I handle events myself (without framework) I just always check for both and execute both if present. (I also return false, but I have the feeling that doesn't work with events attached with node.addEventListener).

So why both? Should I keep checking for both? Or is there actually a difference?

(I know, a lot of questions, but they're all sort of the same =))

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3 Answers 3

up vote 269 down vote accepted

stopPropagation stops the event from bubbling up the event chain.

preventDefault prevents the default action the browser makes on that event.

Let's say you have

<div id="foo">
 <button id="but" />
</div>

$("#foo").click(function() {
   // mouse click on div
});

$("#but").click(function(ev) {
   // mouse click on button
   ev.stopPropagation();
});

With stopPropagation only the buttons click handler is called and the divs click handler never fires.

Where as if you just preventDefault only the browsers default action is stopped but the div's click handler still fires.

Below are some docs on the DOM event objects from MDC and MSDN

MSDN:

MDN:

For IE9 and FF you can just use preventDefault & stopPropagation.

To support IE8 and lower replace stopPropagation with cancelBubble and replace preventDefault with returnValue

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So they're very different? Does IE have two different event methods for that too? (Might they be the same??) It's weird that frameworks do both in their event.stop function... Also weird I've never had trouble with that. I use bubbling a lot. Thanks for the example! –  Rudie May 11 '11 at 11:54
    
@Rudie commented on browser support. –  Raynos May 11 '11 at 12:11
2  
It's worth noting (in case you don't look at the MSDN docs) that cancelBubble and returnValue are both properties (so should be set cancelBubble = true;), and that preventDefault and stopPropagation are methods (so should be called preventDefault();) –  freefaller Jun 17 at 10:26

From quirksmode.org

Event capturing

When you use event capturing

               | |
---------------| |-----------------
| element1     | |                |
|   -----------| |-----------     |
|   |element2  \ /          |     |
|   -------------------------     |
|        Event CAPTURING          |
-----------------------------------

the event handler of element1 fires first, the event handler of element2 fires last.

Event bubbling

When you use event bubbling
               / \
---------------| |-----------------
| element1     | |                |
|   -----------| |-----------     |
|   |element2  | |          |     |
|   -------------------------     |
|        Event BUBBLING           |
-----------------------------------

the event handler of element2 fires first, the event handler of element1 fires last.

Any event taking place in the W3C event model is first captured until it reaches the target element and then bubbles up again.

                 | |  / \
-----------------| |--| |-----------------
| element1       | |  | |                |
|   -------------| |--| |-----------     |
|   |element2    \ /  | |          |     |
|   --------------------------------     |
|        W3C event model                 |
------------------------------------------

From w3.org

If the capturing EventListener wishes to prevent further processing of the event from occurring it may call the stopProgagation method of the Event interface. This will prevent further dispatch of the event, although additional EventListeners registered at the same hierarchy level will still receive the event. Once an event's stopPropagation method has been called, further calls to that method have no additional effect. If no additional capturers exist and stopPropagation has not been called, the event triggers the appropriate EventListeners on the target itself.

And for bubbling:

Any event handler may choose to prevent further event propagation by calling the stopPropagation method of the Event interface. If any EventListener calls this method, all additional EventListeners on the current EventTarget will be triggered but bubbling will cease at that level. Only one call to stopPropagation is required to prevent further bubbling.

Examples:

HTML

<div id="a">
    <a id="b" href="http://www.google.com" target="_blank">google.com</a>
</div>
<p id="c"></p>

JavaScript

var el = document.getElementById("c");
function captureOnClickA(e){
    el.innerHTML += "DIV event capture<br>";
}
function captureOnClickB(e){
    el.innerHTML += "A event capture<br>";
}
function bubblingOnClickA(e){
    el.innerHTML += "DIV event bubbling<br>";
}
function bubblingOnClickB(e){
    el.innerHTML += "A event bubbling<br>";
}
document.getElementById("a").addEventListener("click",captureOnClickA, true);
document.getElementById("b").addEventListener("click",captureOnClickB, true);
document.getElementById("a").addEventListener("click",bubblingOnClickA, false);
document.getElementById("b").addEventListener("click",bubblingOnClickB, false);

Demo, In this example four event listener are executed, and a new tab is opened in the brower. The output is:

DIV event capture
A event capture
A event bubbling
DIV event bubbling

Changing the first function to:

function captureOnClickA(e){
    el.innerHTML += "DIV event capture<br>";
    e.stopPropagation();
}

Will result in this output:

DIV event capture

which means downward propagation of the event is stopped and also its upward propagation. Demo. But it won't prevent the tab from opening.

Adding stopPropagation() to

function captureOnClickB(e){
    el.innerHTML += "A event capture<br>";
    e.stopPropagation();
}

Demo, or

function bubblingOnClickB(e){
    el.innerHTML += "A event bubbling<br>";
    e.stopPropagation();
}

Demo, Will result in the same output because they are on the current EventTarget:

DIV event capture
A event capture
A event bubbling

In these two cases, the event prevented from bubbling up to the parent. Also these two won't prevent the tab from opening. To prevent the tab from opening we need to use preventDefault() to prevent the default browser action:

function captureOnClickA(e){
    el.innerHTML += "DIV event capture<br>";
    e.stopPropagation();
    e.preventDefault();
}

Now the tab won't open and only one of the event listener will be executed. Demo.

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2  
Thanks for the deeper distinction between capturing and bubbling while the other answer only addresses jQuery concerns. –  floribon Oct 29 at 1:26

This is the quote from here

Event.preventDefault

The preventDefault method prevents an event from carrying out its default functionality. For example, you would use preventDefault on an A element to stop clicking that element from leaving the current page:

//clicking the link will *not* allow the user to leave the page 
myChildElement.onclick = function(e) { 
    e.preventDefault(); 
    console.log('brick me!'); 
};

//clicking the parent node will run the following console statement because event propagation occurs
logo.parentNode.onclick = function(e) { 
    console.log('you bricked my child!'); 
};

While the element's default functionality is bricked, the event continues to bubble up the DOM.

Event.stopPropagation

The second method, stopPropagation, allows the event's default functionality to happen but prevents the event from propagating:

//clicking the element will allow the default action to occur but propagation will be stopped...
myChildElement.onclick = function(e) { 
    e.stopPropagation();
    console.log('prop stop! no bubbles!'); 
};

//since propagation was stopped by the child element's onClick, this message will never be seen!
myChildElement.parentNode.onclick = function(e) { 
    console.log('you will never see this message!'); 
};

stopPropagation effectively stops parent elements from knowing about a given event on its child.

While a simple stop method allows us to quickly handle events, it's important to think about what exactly you want to happen with bubbling. I'd bet that all a developer really wants is preventDefault 90% of the time! Incorrectly "stopping" an event could cause you numerous troubles down the line; your plugins may not work and your third party plugins could be bricked. Or worse yet -- your code breaks other functionality on a site.

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