Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I have a class with different methods doing the same thing reading a file. I want to use try-catch block for exception handling. I want to ask if there is any way so that all methods will go inside a single try block as every method will give same exception "file not found"..

share|improve this question
    
did u try C# Generics ?? – Furqan May 11 '11 at 11:50
    
@Furqan: How will generics help to solve this problem? – Cody Gray May 11 '11 at 12:01

My preferred way of handling that would be to call a common method from all of them, so each (individually) looks like:

try {
   // code
} catch(SomeExceptionType ex) {
   DoSomethingAboutThat(ex);
}

However, you can also do it with delegates, i.e.

void Execute(Action action) {
    try {
       // code
    } catch(SomeExceptionType ex) {
       // do something
    }
}

and

Execute(() => {open file});
share|improve this answer

You can use this technique to wrap an action using an extension method:

public static class ActionExtensions
{
    public static Action WrapWithMyCustomHandling(this Action action)
    {
        return () =>
                {
                    try
                    {
                        action();
                    }
                    catch (Exception exception)
                    {

                        // do what you need 
                    }
                };
    }
}

public class DummyClass
{
    public void DummyMethod()
    {
        throw new Exception();
    }
}

and then call it as below:

DummyClass dummyClass = new DummyClass();
Action a = () => dummyClass.DummyMethod();
a.WrapWithMyCustomHandling()();

So basically you can wrap any Action with this.

share|improve this answer

If I understand the question you can't have a single try catch block, but you can call a method from the catch so all methods will share the same exception handling:

try
{
    .... your code
}
catch (SomeException e)
{
    ExceptionHandler(e);
}
share|improve this answer

You either have to add the try-catch around the contents of each method in your class, or go up one level of scope to where your methods are called and enclose those in try-catchs.

There's no way to apply the same exception handling to every method in a class (if there was, I wouldnt reccommend it anyway.)

share|improve this answer

The fact that you have "a bunch of methods doing the same thing" seems like the source of the problem. Can you make that into one method?

Also, you could wrap the try catch block outside of the methods that are being called. That way the caller can do the exception handling - the methods just need to throw them.

share|improve this answer

In case you want all those methods to work on a file stream you could create a method that takes an action working on a file stream and the name of the file. In this method catch the relevant exception, in your case FileNotFoundException and return to the caller, not invoking the action. Otherwise invoke the action on the filestream and return to the caller.

Definition:

 private bool PerformActionOnFileStream(Action<FileStream> action, string path)
 {
      try
      {
           using(FileStream fileStream = new FileStream(@path, FileMode.Open))               
           {
                action(fileStream);
           }
      }
      catch(FileNotFoundException)
      {
           return false;
      }
 }

Usage:

 private void PrintContentOfFile(string path)
 {
      Action<FileStream> action = fileStream => PrintContentOfFileStream(fileStream);

      bool didPerformAction = PerformActionOnFileStream(action, path);
      if(!didPerformAction)
      {
           // Handle error.
      }
 }
share|improve this answer

Aliostad's answer is the closest to what you're actually asking for, and it's a pretty cool solution, but honestly I think this is a matter of refactoring your code. As skaz says, the fact that they're all doing the same thing means they can probably all be consolidated into a single method.

To get the closest to what you're looking for without completely changing the way you do business, I'd suggest a common error handling class within your solution, and a snippet which extends the standard Try-Catch snippet, but still passes enough information to your handler so you can do some specific exception handling and custom error messages.

Your custom error handling class should have a method like the following:

public void HandleError(Sysem.Reflection.MethodBase MethodBase, Exception Exception);

This, or something similar is what I would recommend for your snippet.

    <?xml version="1.0" encoding="utf-8" ?>
    <CodeSnippets  xmlns="http://schemas.microsoft.com/VisualStudio/2005/CodeSnippet">
<CodeSnippet Format="1.0.0">
    <Header>
        <Title>try</Title>
        <Shortcut>try</Shortcut>
        <Description>Code snippet for try catch</Description>
        <Author>Microsoft Corporation</Author>
        <SnippetTypes>
            <SnippetType>Expansion</SnippetType>
            <SnippetType>SurroundsWith</SnippetType>
        </SnippetTypes>
    </Header>
    <Snippet>
        <Declarations>
            <Literal>
                <ID>expression</ID>
                <ToolTip>Exception type</ToolTip>
                <Function>SimpleTypeName(global::System.Exception)</Function>
            </Literal>
        </Declarations>
        <Code Language="csharp">
<![CDATA[try 
{           
    $selected$
}
catch (Exception ex)
{
        YourErrorHandler.HandleError(System.Reflection.MethodBase.GetCurrentMethod(), ex);
}]]>
        </Code>
    </Snippet>
</CodeSnippet>

Obviously, you can extend the HandleError method in anyway you see fit - in my snippets, for the web, I pass information about the current user, but you can use anything you'd like.

Best of luck!

Adam

share|improve this answer
    
I forgot to mention - if you're not used to using snippets, the try snippet can probably be found at C:\Program Files(x86)\Microsoft Visual Studio 10.0\VC#\Snippets\1033\Visual C#\try.snippet. To use the snippet, just go to your code, type try and hit tab twice. If you've never used snippets before you'll probably be very impressed... I'm a bit of a snippet junky, and I've got about 50 of them I use on a regular basis - they really add a lot to my productivity - YMMV of course. Good luck! – Adam G. Carstensen May 11 '11 at 12:17

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.