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I have a config file (config.pl) with my constants :

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use Net::Domain qw(hostname hostfqdn hostdomain domainname);

use constant URL => "http://".domainname()."/";
use constant CGIBIN => URL."cgi-bin/";
use constant CSS => URL."html/css/";
use constant RESSOURCES => URL."html/ressources/";
...

And I would like to use these constants in index.pl, so index.pl starts with :

#!/usr/bin/perl -w
use strict;
use CGI;
require "config.pl";

how to use URL, CGI... in index.pl ?
Thanks,
Bye


EDIT
I found a solution :
config.pm

#!/usr/bin/perl
package Config;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Net::Domain qw(hostname hostfqdn hostdomain domainname);

use constant URL => "http://".domainname()."/";
use constant CGIBIN => URL."cgi-bin/";
1;

index.pl

BEGIN {
    require "config.pm";
}
print Config::URL;

End

share|improve this question
1  
You're heading for trouble by having a constant called CGI and a package called CGI... much confusion will ensue! –  Dancrumb May 11 '11 at 13:43
    
Good remark ! Changing it right now –  eouti May 11 '11 at 13:45

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

What you want to do here is setup a Perl module that you can export from.

Place the following into 'MyConfig.pm':

#!/usr/bin/perl
package MyConfig;
use strict;
use warnings;
use Net::Domain qw(hostname hostfqdn hostdomain domainname);

use constant URL => "http://".domainname()."/";
use constant CGIBIN => URL."cgi-bin/";
use constant CSS => URL."html/css/";
use constant RESSOURCES => URL."html/ressources/";

require Exporter;
our @ISA = 'Exporter';
our @EXPORT = qw(hostname hostfqdn hostdomain domainname URL CGIBIN CSS RESSOURCES);

And then to use it:

use MyConfig;  # which means BEGIN {require 'MyConfig.pm'; MyConfig->import} 

By setting @ISA to Exporter in the MyConfig package, you setup the package to inherit from Exporter. Exporter provides the import method which is implicitly called by the use MyConfig; line. The variable @EXPORT contains the list of names that Exporter should import by default. There are many other options available in Perl's documentation and in the documentation for Exporter

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BEGIN {
    require "config.pl";
}
print URL;

or

require "config.pl";
print URL();
share|improve this answer
    
it doesn't work for me, no need export in config.pl and import in index.pl ? –  eouti May 11 '11 at 13:29
    
@eouti, They actually work for me. What kind of error messages are you getting? –  yibe May 11 '11 at 13:46
    
constant variables are actually subroutines. Without package declaration, they must be in the main:: namespace. –  yibe May 11 '11 at 13:47
    
why the begin block? –  snoofkin May 11 '11 at 13:47
    
Bareword "URL" not allowed while "strict subs" in use at /var/www/cgi-bin/index.pl line 35. Execution of /var/www/cgi-bin/index.pl aborted due to compilation errors. –  eouti May 11 '11 at 13:48
BEGIN { require "config.pl"; }

And you must return a true value at the end of the required source. Usually:

1; 

Although, on certain modules I have done:

print "My::Mod included...\n";

as the last statement in the file. And print returns a true anytime it prints a single character.

See require.


Troubleshooting

  • It could be a directory issue. The .pl file must be in @INC or modified by a path to the file.

Try this:

perl -Mconfig.pl -e 1

If it fails, look at the error message. Actually, in any event, you should be getting more with strict and warnings than "Oops, it failed."

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it doen't work with my scripts. Can you be more precise ? –  eouti May 11 '11 at 13:45

You can't use barewords when you use strict.

A bareword is a essentially a variable name, without a sigil ($,@,%,&,*).

I suggest taking a look at the Readonly module on CPAN for creating constants.

The use constant pragma has a bunch of arcane magic going on that can result in difficult to debug code, if you're not careful.

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1  
There's really nothing arcane or magical about the constant pragma. It is purely syntactic sugar for creating constant subroutines. use constant X => 5; is exactly the same as sub X () {5}. In fact, I prefer the later because it serves as a reminder than the constants are in fact subroutines. –  Eric Strom May 11 '11 at 19:53
    
Maybe not 'magic' but certainly arcane, for the very reason that you prefer the latter: the sugar tries to make a subroutine look like a variable, but it doesn't behave like a variable in places that you would expect it to (like, within interpolated strings). –  Dancrumb May 11 '11 at 20:33

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