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I want to know if the Linq and SQL are equal ( means Linq will return same set of results as the SQL ? I dont have data in tables and I need to convert SQL to LINQ. Please suggest

 var excludeTypes = new[]
               {
                  "CA00", "CA01", "CA03", "CA04", "CA02",
                  "PA00", "PA01", "PA02", "PA03", "PA04"     
               };

 var accounts =
                from account in context.Accounts
                from owner in context.AccountOwners
                from business in context.Businesses
                from accountStatus in context.AccountStatuses
                from legalStatus in context.LegalStatuses
                where !excludeTypes.Contains(account.AccountType)
                select new AccountsReport { Account = account };


 ALTER VIEW [dbo].[vwRptBorrowerAccount]  
AS  
SELECT dbo.tblAccount.[Creditor Registry ID], dbo.tblAccount.[Account No], dbo.tblAccount.[Date Opened], dbo.tblAccount.[Account Status ID],   
               dbo.tblAccount.[Date First Reported], dbo.tblAccount.[Credit Limit], dbo.tblAccount.Balance, dbo.tblAccount.[Minimum Installment], dbo.tblAccount.[Account Type],   
               dbo.tblAccount.Term, dbo.tblAccount.Purpose, dbo.tblAccount.[Account Owner Notes], dbo.tblAccount.[Creditor Notes], dbo.tblAccount.Collateral,   
               dbo.tblAccount.[Collateral Value], dbo.tblAccount.[Legal Status ID], dbo.tblAccount.[Legal Status Date], dbo.tblAccount.LastUpdatedBy,   
               dbo.tblAccount.LastUpdated, dbo.tblAccount.[Unique ID], dbo.tblAccount.[Account Status Date], dbo.tblAccount.Payment, dbo.tblAccount.[Payment Date],   
               dbo.tblAccount.[Balance Date], dbo.tblAccount.[Term Frequency], dbo.tblAccount.[State Change Date],   
               dbo.fn_GetAccountTypeDescription(dbo.tblAccount.[Account Type]) AS [Account Type Description], dbo.tblBusiness.[Business Name] AS CreditorName,   
               dbo.tblBusiness.Address AS CreditorAddress, dbo.tblBusiness.City AS CreditorCity, dbo.tblBusiness.State AS CreditorState,   
               dbo.tblLegalStatus.[Legal Status Description] AS [Legal Status], dbo.tblAccountStatus.[Account Status Description] AS [Account Status],   
               dbo.tblAccountOwner.[Account Owner Registry ID]  
FROM  dbo.tblAccount INNER JOIN  
               dbo.tblAccountOwner ON dbo.tblAccount.[Creditor Registry ID] = dbo.tblAccountOwner.[Creditor Registry ID] AND   
               dbo.tblAccount.[Account No] = dbo.tblAccountOwner.[Account No] INNER JOIN  
               dbo.tblBusiness ON dbo.tblAccount.[Creditor Registry ID] = dbo.tblBusiness.[Registry ID] INNER JOIN  
               dbo.tblAccountStatus ON dbo.tblAccount.[Account Status ID] = dbo.tblAccountStatus.[Account Status ID] INNER JOIN  
               dbo.tblLegalStatus ON dbo.tblAccount.[Legal Status ID] = dbo.tblLegalStatus.[Legal Status ID]  
WHERE (dbo.tblAccount.[Account Type] NOT IN ('CA00', 'CA01', 'CA03', 'CA04', 'CA02', 'PA00', 'PA01', 'PA02', 'PA03', 'PA04'))  
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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

No, your linq is not equivalent to your sql. You are missing the relationships between the tables.


The second and third "from" is translated into a call to System.Linq.Queryable.SelectMany. Since there is no relationship specified, this query matches every Account to every AccountOwner and then each result pair is matched to every Business. This is known as cartesian join (all possible matchings).

from account in context.Accounts
from owner in context.AccountOwners
from business in context.Businesses

A more traditional approach, is to specify the relationship in the query. This query matches every Account to its AccountOwner and then every Account is matched to its Business. This is known as inner join. (Note, must use keyword equals. Also note strict scoping rules on (leftside) equals (rightside)).

from account in context.Accounts
join owner in context.AccountOwners
  on new {account.RegistryId, account.AccountNo}
  equals new {owner.RegistryId, owner.AccountNo}
join business in context.Businesses
  on account.CreditorRegistryID
  equals business.RegistryID

The second and third "from" is translated into a call to System.Linq.Queryable.SelectMany. Since there is a relationship specified, this query matches every Account to its AccountOwners and to its Businesses. This is an inner join (Account = 1, others = Many).

from account in context.Accounts
from owner in account.AccountOwners
from business in account.Businesses

This query matches every Account to its only AccountOwner and its only Business.This is also an inner join (Account = Many, others = 1).

from account in context.Accounts
let owner = account.AccountOwner
let business = account.Business
share|improve this answer
    
Can you please suggest how to correct it ? I have defined relationships among entities. –  DotnetSparrow May 11 '11 at 17:02
    
what if I write like this: from account in context.Accounts from owner in account.AccountOwners from business in owner.Businesses –  DotnetSparrow May 12 '11 at 6:14
    
Sure, that will work. –  David B May 12 '11 at 12:11

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