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I have a bash sequence,

grep "integer =" $1 | awk -F= '{printf("%d\n",int($2*327))}'

which filters something producing smth like:

6768
6572
6638
8403
8436
8436
8305
8502

I need however all these numbers to be placed in a binary file as 16-bit low-endian words (or big-endian if specified). Is there any awk-, bash- way to do it?

Ideally, it could look like:

grep "integer =" $1 | awk -F='{TO16BIT_LENDIAN(printf("%d\n",int($2*327)))}' >> out.bin

share|improve this question
    
1. do you want your output in .bin separated with new-lines? 2. Perl might have something that can do this as you envision it (I'll be surprised if this is possible using the tools you propose). 3. For something this simple, you could write C-language code. (maybe make 2 sep progs for Big vs little endians). 4. good luck! –  shellter May 11 '11 at 15:06
    
@shellter: 1.no, just a stream of bytes 2.well, maybe python, but I'd like to stay with awk/bash if possible 3.python -c "blabla" is probably better, cause a compilation is avoided 4.thanks! –  psihodelia May 11 '11 at 15:10

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

This should work:

cat $1 | grep "integer =" | awk -F='
function out(b)
{
  if(b==0)
  {
    system("printf \"\\00\"");
  }
  else
  {
    printf("%c",b);
  }
}
function shortToLE(n)
{
  n%=65536;
  msb=n/256;
  lsb=n%256;
  out(lsb);
  out(msb);
}

{
  shortToLE($2*327)
}
' >> out.bin

and the optimized way removing the useless cat and grep:

awk -F" =" '
function out(b)
{
  if(b==0)
  {
    system("printf \"\\00\"");
  }
  else
  {
    printf("%c",b);
  }
}
function shortToLE(n)
{
  n%=65536;
  msb=n/256;
  lsb=n%256;
  out(lsb);
  out(msb);
}

$1 == "integer" {
  shortToLE($2*327)
}
' $1 >> out.bin
share|improve this answer
1  
Dang it! You beat me to it. However, you can get rid of the cat and simply put the file name at the end of the awk command. You can also get rid of the grep by searching for "integer=" in awk, and then using "index" and "substr" to remove the "integer=" part. In the end, you're simply left with a single awk program. Despite the "useless cat", I'll still give you a +1. –  David W. May 11 '11 at 16:55
1  
Thanks for pointing that. I was too much focused on the somewhat tricky awk part and overlook what was surrounding it, which I basically just cut and paste. Adding the optimized way to my reply. –  jlliagre May 11 '11 at 20:17

Writing to a file with a specific format is usually done with a higher-level language. An example with Ruby (where your input file is in $1:

ruby -e '
  nums = File.readlines(ARGV[0]).collect {|line| (Float(line) * 327).to_i}
  File.open("out.bin", "wb") do |fh|
    fh.write( nums.pack("v*") )
  end
' "$1"

Ruby's Array#pack method is documented here.

Update:

using -n switch:

ruby -ne '
  BEGIN {fh = File.open("out.bin","wb")}
  fh.write( [(Float($_) * 327).to_i].pack("v") )
' numbers
share|improve this answer
    
Would probably look less cluttered using ruby -ne –  ninjalj May 11 '11 at 20:07
    
+1 for use of pack –  ninjalj May 11 '11 at 20:08
    
@ninjalj, not really, see update –  glenn jackman May 12 '11 at 20:35
    
@glenn: any reason to write it to a file, instead of to stdout? –  ninjalj May 12 '11 at 20:42
    
@ninjalj, that's a requirement of the question. –  glenn jackman May 12 '11 at 20:55

And now for the ugly truth that the script using printf("%c",data) no longer works

And here is my ugly as hell totally * * * *ed up workaround. Augh!

# This ugly hack forces our broken system to pretend it works
MAGIC_SHIT=((ENVIRON[LANG]=="C")?0:0xd800);
function TO16BIT_LENDIAN(n){return sprintf("%c%c",(MAGIC_SHIT+and(n,0xff)),(MAGIC_SHIT+rshift(and(n,0xff00),8)));}

Some explanations migh be required here. When we write our scripts, it is assumed that

export LANG=C

is set. However, when when one has

en_US.UTF-8

then POSIX-correctness kicks in, and you are now no longer able to play with bytes as you would, instead forced with treating each character as the smallest unit. What this means is

0x00 up to 0x7f = 0xYY  // sprintf("%c",n) prints ok
0x80 up to 0xbf = 0xc2 0xYY  // sprintf("%c",n) prints 0xc2 in front
0xc0 up to 0xff = 0xc3 + 0x80..0xb0  // Totally junk, not what we want.

You are now no longer able to print raw bytes grater thatn 128.

Now, this is because the UTF-8 specifcation tells us to do so.
And here is the important part
Most prasers that convert between utf-8 character code, perform simple bit operation to do so. When we feed 0xd800 or grater value to these prasers, most often, while undocumented feature, allow you to print raw bytes as you would have on older systems

This is totally a ugly hack that you should not depend on. As far as I know, no such specification exsists, or comes off top of my head. Please tell me if there is one such.

However, when you are on a system that has the wrong LANG value, or when your script needs to handle utf-8 characters, on most part of the script, except just the data output, then it could be considered a temporary workaround, untill somehow we are able to set LANG or equlavant from within the script.

Last checked on gawk 4.0.1

I hate this hack

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