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I have a piece of code which generates quite large lists in each iteration. To save memory I want to write each list to a binary file in each iteration after the list has been generated. I have tried this with text files(even setting the parameter to "wb" in linux). "wb" seems not to have any effect for the file to be written in binary or text format. Moreover, the written file is huge and I don't want this. I am sure that If i can write these lists in binary format this file will be much smaller. thanks

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1  
What's the type of the list items? Is using NumPy an option? –  Sven Marnach May 11 '11 at 15:03
3  
There is no such thing as "[the] binary format". There are formats that don't resemble text in any encoding (respectively, aren't supposed to). However, there's a myriad of such formats and an infinite number of possible ones. What binary format do you want? –  delnan May 11 '11 at 15:07
    
@Sven: Eventually this list will be fed to a classifier as feature vectors –  Hossein May 12 '11 at 8:27
    
@delnan: the format is not really important, as long as the generated file is not too big. –  Hossein May 12 '11 at 8:28

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Since you mentioned the need for compressibility, I'd suggest using pickle with the gzip module to compress your output. You can write and read back your lists one at a time, here's an example of how:

import gzip, pickle

output = gzip.open('pickled.gz', 'wb', compresslevel=9)

for x in range(10):
     output.write(pickle.dumps(range(10)) + '\n\n')
output.close()

And then use a generator to yield the lists back one at a time:

def unpickler(input):
    partial = []
    for line in input:
        partial.append(line)
        if line == '\n':
            obj = ''.join(partial)
            partial = []
            yield pickle.loads(obj)

input = gzip.open('pickled.gz', 'rb')
for l in unpickler(input):
    print l

[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
[0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]
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@zeekey: thank you for you code, but the problem is that, as I mentioned, this list of lists will be very big to fit into memory first and then writing it into file. I need to write list by list to file to not to run out of memory. –  Hossein May 12 '11 at 8:35
    
You can dump your pickled objects one at a time using '\n\n' (or something similar) to separate records. –  zeekay May 12 '11 at 8:52
    
@Hossein I added an example of how you can read/write the lists one at a time, hope that helps! –  zeekay May 12 '11 at 9:16

You can use cPickle to serialize your lists and dump the result to a file.

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The only thing the 'b' flag changes is how linebreak translations are done to support Windows.

import pickle
help(pickle.load)
help(pickle.dump)

# seems fairly efficient, taking 200bytes to store [1,2,...,100],
# 2.7kb to store [1,2,...,1000],
# and 29kb to store [1,2,...,10000]:
>>> len(pickle.dumps(list(range(100))))
208
>>> len(pickle.dumps(list(range(1000))))
2752
>>> len(pickle.dumps(list(range(10000))))
29770

#create and store
data = {}
data['myList'] = [i for i in range(100)]
with open('myfile.pickle', 'wb') as f:
    pickle.dump(data, f)

# retrieve
with open('myfile.pickle', 'wb') as f:
    data2 = pickle.load(f)
print(data2)

Note that it is insecure to use pickle on any user-supplied data. You will want to open the file you are writing to in binary mode.

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