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ID   FirstName   LastName
1      John        Doe
2      Bugs        Bunny
3      John        Johnson

I want to select DISTINCT results from the FirstName column, but I need the corresponding ID and LastName.

The result set needs to show only one John, but with an ID of 1 and a LastName of Doe.

share|improve this question
    
You want the last name belonging to the lowest ID with a distinct first name? – Thomas Langston May 11 '11 at 15:57
4  
use GROUP BY instead – diEcho May 11 '11 at 15:57
    
What is the logic that should go into the selection of the top one? I would think you would want both John Doe and John Johnson to show up since they are two distinct Johns but that is just me. – judda May 11 '11 at 16:00
2  
DISTINCT is not a function. All answers with DISTINCT() are wrong. The error will show up when you do not place it after SELECT. – Question Overflow Feb 23 '14 at 7:46
    
ALL answers using parentheses after the word distinct are indeed wrong. Distinct is NOT a function so it cannot accept a parameter. The parentheses following distinct are simply ignored. Unless you are using PostgreSQL where the parentheses will form a "complex data type" – Used_By_Already Feb 14 at 2:14

13 Answers 13

up vote 77 down vote accepted

try this query

 SELECT ID, FirstName, LastName FROM table GROUP BY(FirstName)
share|improve this answer
18  
this doesn't work in MySQL 5.5 – NullVoxPopuli Oct 13 '11 at 19:23
5  
How do we know which row will be returned? – Full Decent May 5 '13 at 16:51
12  
@Full Decent you can't, according to MySQL documentation‌​: "The server is free to choose any value from each group, so unless they are the same, the values chosen are indeterminate.". In practice I've successfully used this kind of queries with ORDER BY clause, for instance you could add ORDER BY id ASC/DESC and MySQL would return consistent results every time you would execute the query. But i would be sure whether anyone should use undocumented features in production environment. – Arunas Junevicius Jun 3 '13 at 14:54
1  
O.P. doesn't mention mysql version. – diEcho Jun 11 '13 at 4:43

The DISTINCT keyword doesn't really work the way you're expecting it to. When you use SELECT DISTINCT col1, col2, col3 you are in fact selecting all unique {col1, col2, col3} tuples.

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2  
Thanks for pointing this out Brian. Can you provide an example of how I could utilize GROUP BY to obtain the same results? – m r May 11 '11 at 16:20
SELECT ID,LastName 
From TABLE_NAME 
GROUP BY FirstName 
HAVING COUNT(*) >=1
share|improve this answer
1  
adding HAVING made my query 50% slower. – Buttle Butkus Oct 21 '15 at 22:08

WARNING

With MySQL GROUP BY will not always yield the expected results when used with ORDER BY The best method of implementation to ensure expected results is to filter the result set scope using a Subquery like so.

table_name data

ID   FirstName   LastName
1      John        Doe
2      Bugs        Bunny
3      John        Johnson

Query

SELECT * FROM (
   SELECT * FROM table_name ORDER BY ID DESC
) AS t1
GROUP BY FirstName

#Results
ID   FirstName   LastName
2      Bugs        Bunny
3      John        Johnson

Versus

SELECT * FROM table_name GROUP BY FirstName ORDER BY ID DESC

#Results
ID   FirstName   LastName
2      Bugs        Bunny
1      John        Doe

Example Test Case: http://sqlfiddle.com/#!2/36511d/3

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1  
Most complete answer by far. Changing 'ID desc' to 'ID asc' in the first query allow us to retrieve either 'John Doe' or 'John Johnson'. Changing 'ID desc' in second query does'nt have this effect. – carla Jun 19 '15 at 15:44
    
On postgres you need ID in group by not sure of mysql. – Sachin Prasad Aug 20 '15 at 14:04
SELECT DISTINCT(firstName), ID, LastName from tableName GROUP BY firstName

Would be the best bet IMO.

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17  
this won't work, it will also take the ID and lastname into the distinct evaluation. – Ludo - Off the record Jun 30 '14 at 15:05

Not sure if you can do this with MySQL, but you can use a CTE in T-SQL

; WITH tmpPeople AS (
 SELECT 
   DISTINCT(FirstName),
   MIN(Id)      
 FROM People
)
SELECT
 tP.Id,
 tP.FirstName,
 P.LastName
FROM tmpPeople tP
JOIN People P ON tP.Id = P.Id

Otherwise you might have to use a temporary table.

share|improve this answer
SELECT firstName, ID, LastName from tableName GROUP BY firstName
share|improve this answer
SELECT DISTINCT(FirstName), LastName, ID FROM people HAVING MIN(ID);

I think this is what you are asking for.

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that he is doing already. read the OP again – diEcho May 11 '11 at 16:00
1  
@diEcho Your right, I misread the question. Fixed the query to hopefully satisfy the constraints. – Ryan Matthews May 11 '11 at 16:07
select distinct (column1), column2
from table1
group by column1
share|improve this answer
    
DISTINCT() is not a function. Also DISTINCT and GROUP BY are doing the same thing, so no reason put them both. – Marki555 Jul 15 '15 at 7:37

I have a large MySQL 5.6 table (~180k rows), and in my testing using GROUP BY is very slow, while this type of query worked significantly faster:

SELECT `a`.`distinct_col`,
`b`.`name`, `b`.`color` [, `b`.... ]

FROM
(
  SELECT DISTINCT `disctinct_col` FROM `table`
) AS `a`
LEFT JOIN
`table` AS `b` /* joining to itself */
ON `a`.`distinct_col` = `b`.`distinct_col`
[OTHER JOINS HERE]
/* GROUP BY `distinct_col` */ /* NOT USING THIS */
ORDER BY `b`.`name` ASC, `b`.`color` DESC LIMIT 30 OFFSET 7260

The LEFT JOIN to the DISTINCT subquery acts pretty much the same as a GROUP BY. But, strangely, the results come back much faster this way in my tests. The strategy is to get the DISTINCT column quickly first, and then join those results to the main table.

Using GROUP BY, my query takes around 4.15 seconds to complete. Using the above method, it takes about 2.55 seconds, a savings of 48.5%.

Here is what the query looks like using GROUP BY:

SELECT /* `a`.`distinct_col`, */ /* commenting DISTINCT section */
`b`.`name`, `b`.`color` [, `b`.... ][, `c`....]

FROM
/* (
  SELECT DISTINCT `disctinct_col` FROM `table`
) AS `a`
LEFT JOIN *//* commenting DISTINCT join */
`table` AS `b` /* main table */
/* ON `a`.`distinct_col` = `b`.`distinct_col` */
[OTHER JOINS HERE]
GROUP BY `distinct_col` /* using GROUP BY, it will be much slower */
ORDER BY `b`.`name` ASC, `b`.`color` DESC LIMIT 30 OFFSET 7260

I still have not been able to achieve the sub-one-second speeds I can get if I abandon GROUP BY and DISTINCT altogether. If anyone has a clue about that, let me know.

share|improve this answer
    
it's because of the other joins, not an inherent issue with group by. if you substituted SELECT disctinct_col FROM table GROUP BY disctinct_col where you currently have the distinct subquery performance would be near identical. In the second query the group by is asked to span more rows, hnce it takes longer. Placing select distinct at the start of the second query (instead of the group by) would also take longer. – Used_By_Already Feb 14 at 2:04
    
@Used_By_Already I see, so basically, if you somehow reduce your subquery resultset, no matter how, you speed up the join because there's less to join on. DISTINCT and GROUP BY are basically the same then. I wouldn't be surprised if they have a common implementation. – Buttle Butkus Feb 14 at 2:27
    
SELECT DISTINCT is not the same a GROUP BY (you can do aggregations using GROUP BY that you cannot do with SELECT DISTINCT) although the impact in your query example would be near identical. But it is the reduction of rows being considered that is the most probable cause of your time differential. – Used_By_Already Feb 14 at 2:31

Keep in mind when using the group by and order by that MySQL is the ONLY database that allows for columns to be used in the group by and/or order by piece that are not part of the select statement.

So for example: select column1 from table group by column2 order by column3

That will not fly in other databases like Postgres, Oracle, MSSQL, etc. You would have to do the following in those databases

select column1, column2, column3 from table group by column2 order by column3

Just some info in case you ever migrate your current code to another database or start working in another database and try to reuse code.

share|improve this answer
SELECT DISTINCT(FirstName), ID, LastName from <tableName> GROUP BY FirstName

Fixed capatalizing and syntax.

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1  
this doesn't work, it will also take the ID and lastname in the distinct evaluation. – Ludo - Off the record Jun 30 '14 at 15:03

You can use group by for display distinct values and also corresponding fields.

select * from tabel_name group by FirstName

Now you got output like this:

ID    FirstName     LastName
2     Bugs          Bunny
1     John          Doe


If you want to answer like

ID    FirstName     LastName
1     John          Doe
2     Bugs          Bunny

then use this query,

select * from table_name group by FirstName order by ID
share|improve this answer
2  
This will not always yield expected results when grouping with order by – fyrye Sep 30 '14 at 15:35

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