Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise
SELECT u.username, count(t.tid) as total
FROM tbl2 t
JOIN users u ON t.userid = u.userid
GROUP BY t.userid

The above query works fine and all, it returns the number of total task for each user that has atleast one task in the tbl2 table.

But what i want to do is return all users, Even if the user doesn't have any records associated to him in the second tbl2 table. I want the total to show as 0 for those users who doesn't have any records, how can i accomplish this?

share|improve this question
up vote 4 down vote accepted

The problem with the other answers given is that you want to select all users that have no associated records; using a LEFT JOIN, the users table is on the wrong (nullable) side of the join. You could replace that LEFT JOIN with a RIGHT JOIN, but that syntax always feels unintuitive to me.

The standard answer is to reverse the order of the tables while using a LEFT JOIN:

SELECT u.username, count(t.tid) as total
FROM users u
LEFT JOIN tbl2 t ON t.userid = u.userid
GROUP BY u.username

Note that it's better practice (and, in some DBMSes, required) to group on the non-aggregated columns in the SELECT list, rather than grouping on userid and selecting username.

share|improve this answer
    
i figured that out a few mins ago, using the other answers it was showing me 0's but not all users, i reversed the query and started grouping by u.userid instead of t.userid and it worked (one question though, posting it below), i'm accepting yours as the solution since its the complete solution and upping +1 the rest :) thanks :) – Zubair1 May 11 '11 at 16:22
    
is the t.userid an aggregated column (coz i thought the total was?) – Zubair1 May 11 '11 at 16:24
1  
Aggregated columns are those contained in aggregate functions such as COUNT(). So no, userid is not an aggregated column in your query - so that (or username, in this case) is the column you group by. Also please note that since you may have NULL records in t, you should group by u.userid. Otherwise, you may still miss zero-count users. – Dan J May 11 '11 at 16:25
    
thanks for explaining, and yeah i'm using u.userid now :) – Zubair1 May 11 '11 at 16:28

You should use a LEFT JOIN insteed of an INNER JOIN (default type of join), something like this:

SELECT u.username, count(t.tid) as total
FROM tbl2 t
LEFT JOIN users u ON t.userid = u.userid
GROUP BY t.userid
share|improve this answer
    
+1 thanks didn't know JOIN() = INNER JOIN() by default. – Zubair1 May 11 '11 at 16:25

You'd want to use a LEFT JOIN then instead

SELECT u.username, count(t.tid) as total
FROM tbl2 t
LEFT JOIN users u ON t.userid = u.userid
GROUP BY t.userid

LEFT JOIN will join the table and show null column results for tbl2 if an associated entry doesn't exist.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.