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I migrated our reporting services from version 2008 to another server version 2008 R2. In version 2008 the reports work fine on Safari. The new version 2008 R2 the reports do not show up at all. All I see is the parameter section and then the report is blank. Same in Chrome. According to Microsoft Safari IS supported if in a limited fashion. The reports are not complex. In fact I created a report that only had a line on it to see if it would show up in Safari but no, that report is completely blank as well. Did anyone make SSRS reports viewable on Safari? Do I have to mess with some kind of a configuration setting?

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duplicate: stackoverflow.com/questions/5428017/… –  Tim Partridge Aug 12 '11 at 16:40
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10 Answers

Ultimate solution (works in SSRS 2012 too!)

Append to "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSRS10_50.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportManager\js\ReportingServices.js" (on the SSRS Server) the following script:

function pageLoad() {    
var element = document.getElementById("ctl31_ctl10");
if (element) 
{
    element.style.overflow = "visible"; 
} }

Actually i dont' know if div's name is always ctl31_ctl10: in my case it is (instead over SQL 2012 azzlak found ctl32_ctl09).
If this solution doesn't work, look at the HTML from your browser to see if the script has worked properly changing the overflow:auto property to overflow:visible.

Reason:

Chrome and Safari render overflow:auto in different way respect to IE.

SSRS HTML is QuirksMode HTML and depends on IE 5.5 bugs. Non-IE browsers don't have the IE quirksmode and therefore render the HTML correctly

The HTML page produced by SSRS 2008 R2 reports contain a div which has overflow:auto style, and it turns report into an invisible report.

<div id="ctl31_ctl10" style="height:100%;width:100%;overflow:auto;position:relative;">
...</div>

Changing manually (using Chrome's debug window) final HTML overflow:auto in overflow:visible i can see reports on Chrome.

I love Tim's solution, it's easy and working.

But there is still a problem: any time the user change parameters (my reports use parameters!) AJAX refreshes the div, the overflow:auto tag is rewritten, and no script changes it.
This technote detail explains what is the problem.

This happens because in a page built with AJAX panels, only the AJAX panels change their state, without refreshing the whole page. Consequently, the OnLoad events you applied on the tag are only fired once: the first time your page loads. After that, changing any of the AJAX panels will not trigger these events anymore.

Mr.einarq suggested me the solution here.

Another option is to rename your function to pageLoad. Any functions with this name will be called automatically by asp.net ajax if it exists on the page, also after each partial update. If you do this you can also remove the onload attribute from the body tag

So wrote the improved script that is shown in the solution.

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1  
I altered function page_load to pageLoad in order to trigger the script. Otherwise, it seems to solve rendering issues in Chrome 13. Unfortunately basic auth in SSRS does not seem to work with Safari 5.1, so I can't verify there. –  MattK Sep 14 '11 at 23:28
    
MattK you're right. I corrected my answer –  Emanuele Greco Sep 15 '11 at 8:14
    
The reason is WRONG. The real reason is, SSRS HTML is QuirksMode HTML and depends on IE 5.5 bugs. Non-IE browsers don't have the IE quirksmode and therefore render the HTML correctly. For browsers that don't emulate IE 5.5 bugs in their QuirksMode, it lacks setting the table width... This also applies to IE 10 by the way, as it has a new default-quirksmode mode. –  Quandary Feb 19 '13 at 13:43
    
@Quandary thanks, update the answer –  Emanuele Greco Feb 19 '13 at 17:04
2  
Works perfectly. But for SQL Server 2012, the offending div id is ctl32_ctl09. –  azzlack May 29 '13 at 7:53
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Just include SizeToReportContent="true" as shown below

<rsweb:ReportViewer ID="ReportViewer1" runat="server" SizeToReportContent="True"...
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3  
I don't know why this is not the accepted solution as a) it works fine, and b) it seems to be the built in solution. Not a hack to make reportviewer work properly. Not that there is anything wrong with hacking ReportViewer to make it work. Seems like the whole reportviewer is on big hack. –  Raif Jan 27 '13 at 14:16
    
Doesn't this solution only apply to embedding the ReportViewer control in an application? If this applies to Report Manager and reports run from the ReportServer URL, then please specify where you would need to include this edit. –  Registered User Feb 5 at 20:38
1  
Are you referring to the following line in \SQL\MSRS11.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportServer\Pages\ReportViewer.aspx: <RS:ReportViewerHost ID="ReportViewerControl" runat="server"/> –  Registered User Feb 7 at 18:04
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I am using Chrome version 21 with SQL 2008 R2 SP1 and none of the above fixes worked for me. Below is the code that did work, as with the other answers I added this bit of code to Append to "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSRS10_50.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportManager\js\ReportingServices.js" (on the SSRS Server) :

//Fix to allow Chrome to display SSRS Reports
function pageLoad() { 
    var element = document.getElementById("ctl31_ctl09");
    if (element) 
    {
        element.style.overflow = "visible";         
    } 
}
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1  
This solution is working very well in our environment. Thanks Mike –  Vince Perta Aug 22 '12 at 19:39
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This is a known issue. The problem is that a div tag has the style "overflow: auto" which apparently is not implemented well with WebKit which is used by Safari and Chrome (see Emanuele Greco's answer). I did not know how to take advantage of Emanuele's suggestion to use the RS:ReportViewerHost element, but I solved it using JavaScript.

Problem

enter image description here

Solution

Since "overflow: auto" is specified in the style attribute of the div element with id "ctl31_ctl10", we can't override it in a stylesheet file so I resorted to JavaScript. I appended the following code to "C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSRS10_50.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportManager\js\ReportingServices.js"

function FixSafari()
{    
    var element = document.getElementById("ctl31_ctl10");
    if (element) 
    {
        element.style.overflow = "visible";  //default overflow value
    }
}

// Code from http://stackoverflow.com/questions/9434/how-do-i-add-an-additional-window-onload-event-in-javascript
if (window.addEventListener) // W3C standard
{
    window.addEventListener('load', FixSafari, false); // NB **not** 'onload'
} 
else if (window.attachEvent) // Microsoft
{
    window.attachEvent('onload', FixSafari);
}

Note

There appears to be a solution for SSRS 2005 that I have not tried but I don't think it is applicable to SSRS 2008 because I can't find the "DocMapAndReportFrame" class.

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There is one thing I do not understand. if you apply the code function FixSari in \ReportingServices.js, and then you execute the code to display the report in SSRS, where do you apply the function to execute the source method code for FixSafari? If I understand correctly, the original code for ReportingServices.js is generated and in the end you execute FixSafari code? –  FullMetalGame Nov 25 '13 at 11:55
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Here is the solution I used for Report Server 2008 R2

It should work regardless of what the Report Server will output for use for in its "id" attribute of the table. I don't think you can always assume it will be "ctl31_fixedTable"

I used a mix of the suggestion above and some ways to dynamically load jquery libraries into a page from javascript file found here

On the server go to the directory: C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSRS10_50.MSSQLSERVER\Reporting Services\ReportManager\js

Copy the jquery library jquery-1.6.2.min.js into the directory

Create a backup copy of the file ReportingServices.js Edit the file. And append this to the bottom of it:

var jQueryScriptOutputted = false;
function initJQuery() {

    //if the jQuery object isn't available
    if (typeof(jQuery) == 'undefined') {


        if (! jQueryScriptOutputted) {
            //only output the script once..
            jQueryScriptOutputted = true;

            //output the script 
            document.write("<scr" + "ipt type=\"text/javascript\" src=\"../js/jquery-1.6.2.min.js\"></scr" + "ipt>");
         }
        setTimeout("initJQuery()", 50);
    } else {

        $(function() {     

        // Bug-fix on Chrome and Safari etc (webkit)
        if ($.browser.webkit) {

            // Start timer to make sure overflow is set to visible
             setInterval(function () {
                var div = $('table[id*=_fixedTable] > tbody > tr:last > td:last > div')

                div.css('overflow', 'visible');
            }, 1000);
        }

        });
    }        
}

initJQuery();
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+1 For most flexible and complete solution –  rmcsharry Oct 28 '12 at 12:59
    
One question though, if there is more than one report table on the page, won't this cause multiple loads of the controls? If so then the very first line could be changed to : var jQueryScriptOutputted = ((typeof(jQueryScriptOutputted) == 'undefined') ? false : true); –  rmcsharry Oct 28 '12 at 13:00
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You can fix this easily with jQuery - and a little ugly hack :-)

I have a asp.net page with a ReportViewer user control.

 <rsweb:ReportViewer ID="ReportViewer1" runat="server"...

In the document ready event I then start a timer and look for the element which needs the overflow fix (as previous posts):

 <script type="text/javascript">
    $(function () {
        // Bug-fix on Chrome and Safari etc (webkit)
        if ($.browser.webkit) {
            // Start timer to make sure overflow is set to visible
             setInterval(function () {
                var div = $('#<%=ReportViewer1.ClientID %>_fixedTable > tbody > tr:last > td:last > div')
                div.css('overflow', 'visible');
            }, 1000);
        }
    });
</script>

Better than assuming it has a certain id. You can adjust the timer to whatever you like. I set it to 1000 ms here.

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I've used this. Add a script reference to jquery on the Report.aspx page. Use the following to link up JQuery to the microsoft events. Used a little bit of Eric's suggestion for setting the overflow.

$(document).ready(function () {
    if (navigator.userAgent.toLowerCase().indexOf("webkit") >= 0) {        
        Sys.Application.add_init(function () {
            var prm = Sys.WebForms.PageRequestManager.getInstance();
            if (!prm.get_isInAsyncPostBack()) {
                prm.add_endRequest(function () {
                    var divs = $('table[id*=_fixedTable] > tbody > tr:last > td:last > div')
                    divs.each(function (idx, element) {
                        $(element).css('overflow', 'visible');
                    });
                });
            }
        });
    }
});
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The solution provided by Emanuele worked for me. I could see the report when I accessed it directly from the server but when I used a ReportViewer control on my aspx page, I was unable to see the report. Upon inspecting the rendered HTML, I found a div by the id "ReportViewerGeneral_ctl09" (ReportViewerGeneral is the server id of the report viewer control) which had it's overflow property set to auto.

<div id="ReportViewerGeneral_ctl09" style="height: 100%; width: 100%; overflow: auto; position: relative; ">...</div>

I used the procedure explained by Emanuele to change this to visible as follows:

function pageLoad() {
    var element = document.getElementById("ReportViewerGeneral_ctl09");

    if (element) {
        element.style.overflow = "visible";
    }
}
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FYI - none of the above worked for me in 2012 SP1...simple solution was to embed credentials in the shared data source and then tell Safari to trust the SSRS server site. Then it worked great! Took days chasing down supposed solutions like above only to find out integrated security won't work reliably on Safari - you have to mess with the keychain on the mac and then still wouldn't work reliably.

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For Chrome, download the "IE Tab" add-on here and so far I have no rendering issues. Running on Windows client, BTW, so no help for Apple-ites.

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-1 because it doesn't work on the MAC and IE Tab requires a working IE installation. –  Michael Brown Aug 29 '12 at 20:15
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