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In Java, I am trying to find a way to convert a float number into a fraction string. For example:

float num = 1.33333;
String numStr = Convert(num); // Should return "1 1/3"

float num2 = 1.333;
String numStr2 = Convert(num2); // Should also return "1 1/3"

float num3 = 0.5;
String numStr3 = Convert(num3); // Should return "1/2"

float num4 = 2.25;
String numStr4 = Convert(num4); // Should return "2 1/4"

Any ideas how to do this in Java?

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4  
But 1.33333 isn't 1 1/3, it's 1 33333/100000. I imagine you want to have some sort of fuzzy threshold for repeated digits like this, otherwise it's pretty impossible for any algorithm to come up with the answer that you want (rather than the "right" answer). –  CanSpice May 11 '11 at 18:11
    
Yeah, 3 decimal places only. –  icemanind May 11 '11 at 18:15
    
See also Stern–Brocot, shown here‌​. –  trashgod Oct 6 '11 at 3:18
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6 Answers

up vote 6 down vote accepted

The simplest approach might be to use trial and error.

public static String toFraction(double d, int factor) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    if (d < 0) {
        sb.append('-');
        d = -d;
    }
    long l = (long) d;
    if (l != 0) sb.append(l);
    d -= l;
    double error = Math.abs(d);
    int bestDenominator = 1;
    for(int i=2;i<=factor;i++) {
        double error2 = Math.abs(d - (double) Math.round(d * i) / i);
        if (error2 < error) {
            error = error2;
            bestDenominator = i;
        }
    }
    if (bestDenominator > 1)
        sb.append(' ').append(Math.round(d * bestDenominator)).append('/') .append(bestDenominator);
    return sb.toString();
}

public static void main(String... args)  {
    System.out.println(toFraction(1.3333, 1000));
    System.out.println(toFraction(1.1428, 1000));
    for(int i=1;i<100000000;i*=10) {
        System.out.println("PI "+i+": "+toFraction(3.1415926535897932385, i));
    }
}

prints

1 1/3
1 1/7
PI 1: 3
PI 10: 3 1/7
PI 100: 3 14/99
PI 1000: 3 16/113
PI 10000: 3 16/113
PI 100000: 3 14093/99532
PI 1000000: 3 140914/995207
PI 10000000: 3 244252/1725033
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1  
+1 nice. Thanks. I like the solution. –  Boro May 11 '11 at 18:38
    
I am sure there is a less brute force solution for larger denominators, however this works up to 6 digits quickly. –  Peter Lawrey May 11 '11 at 18:41
    
This worked well for me. This is for a cooking application I'm working on, so it doesn't need to be very complex. There will never be something like "1 7/8 Cups Milk". As long as common stuff like 1/2, 3/4, 1/4, and 1/3 work, I'm good. –  icemanind May 11 '11 at 19:44
    
The factor will let you determine the largest denominator you want and it will find the closest approximation. –  Peter Lawrey May 11 '11 at 19:56
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Look into chain fractions. This allows you to determine denominator and fraction within a given accuracy.

For Pi you can get 22/7 or 355/113 depending on when you choose to stop.

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This might be of help:

http://www.merriampark.com/fractions.htm

Otherwise you'd need some way of telling Convert() how far out you want to take things. Maybe a maximum reduced demoninator or something like that. That way you'll get "1 1/3" for both of the first two examples you have above rather than "1 33333/100000" for the first and "1 333/1000" for the second.

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Extract the fractional part of the number (for example, ((int) 0.5 + 1) - 0.5, then divide one by the result (1 / 0.5). You'll get the denominator of the fraction. Then cast the float to an int, and you'll get the integer part. Then concatenate both.

It's just a simple solution, and will work only if the numerator of the fraction is 1.

double n = 1.2f;

int denominator = 1 / (Math.abs(n - (int) n - 0.0001)); //- 0.0001 so the division doesn't get affected by the float point aproximated representation
int units = (int) n;

int numerator = units * denominator + 1;

System.out.println("" + numerator + "/" + denominator); //6/5
System.out.println("" + units + " 1/" + denominator); //1 1/5
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Assume you have "0.1234567", then count how many numbers after the decimal point (which is 7). then multiply the number with 10 ^ 7, now you have "1234567".

divide 1234567 over 10 ^ 7. Then, simplify the fraction using the GCD of the two numbers.

0.1234567 * 10000000 = 1234567
=> 1234567 / 10000000
=> System.out.println(1234567 / gcd(1234567,10000000) + "/" + 10000000/gcd(1234567,10000000));
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The problem with this is that floating point numbers in Java (and most other languages) are not decimal, but binary. Thus you would have to use a suitable power of two instead of a power of ten. –  Paŭlo Ebermann May 11 '11 at 21:19
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Modified the FOR loop to break the loop, when the best denominator is already identified.

if (error2 == 0) break;

public static String toFraction(double d, int factor) {
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    if (d < 0) {
        sb.append('-');
        d = -d;
    }
    long l = (long) d;
    if (l != 0) sb.append(l);
    d -= l;
    double error = Math.abs(d);
    int bestDenominator = 1;
    for(int i=2;i<=factor;i++) {
        double error2 = Math.abs(d - (double) Math.round(d * i) / i);
        if (error2 < error) {
            error = error2;
            bestDenominator = i;
            if (error2 == 0) break;
        }
    }
    if (bestDenominator > 1)
        sb.append(' ').append(Math.round(d * bestDenominator)).append('/') .append(bestDenominator);
    return sb.toString();
}

public static void main(String... args)  {
    System.out.println(toFraction(1.3333, 1000));
    System.out.println(toFraction(1.1428, 1000));
    for(int i=1;i<100000000;i*=10) {
        System.out.println("PI "+i+": "+toFraction(3.1415926535897932385, i));
    }
}
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