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I have a situation where I have lists of objects that have to be merged. Each object in the list will have a property that explains how it should be treated in the merger. So assume the following..

enum Cascade {
  Full,
  Unique,
  Right,
  Left
}

class Note {
  int Id { get; set; }
  Cascade Cascade { get; set; }
  // lots of other data.
}

var list1 = new List<Note>{
 new Note {
   Id = 1,
   Cascade.Full,
   // data
 },
 new Note {
   Id = 2,
   Cascade.Right,
   // data
 }
};
var list2 = new List<Note>{
  new Note {
   Id = 1,
   Cascade.Left,
   // data
  }
};
var list3 = new List<Note>{
  new Note {
    Id = 1,
    Cascade.Unique,
    // data similar to list1.Note[0]
  }
}

So then, I'll have a method ...

Composite(this IList<IList<Note>> notes){
  return new List<Note> {
      notes.SelectMany(g => g).Where(g => g.Cascade == Cascade.All).ToList()
      // Here is the problem... 
      .SelectMany(g => g).Where(g => g.Cascade == Cascade.Right)
      .Select( // I want to do a _LastOrDefault_ )
      // continuing for the other cascades. 
  }
}

This is where I get lost. I need to do multiple SelectMany statements, but I don't know how to. But this is the expected behavior.

Cascade.Full

The Note will be in the final collection no matter what.

Cascade.Unique

The Note will be in the final collection one time, ignoring any duplicates.

Cascade.Left

The Note will be in the final collection, First instances superseding subsequent instances. (So then, Notes 1, 2, 3 are identical. Note 1 gets pushed through)

Cascade.Right

The Note will be in the final collection, Last instance superseding duplicates. (So Notes 1, 2, 3 are identical. Note 3 gets pushed trough)

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1  
I find it is often helpful to write code the "long" way when the LINQ way isn't immediately obvious. In doing so, you're able to sort through all the details and get a working solution. Then the LINQ version becomes easier to reason. –  Anthony Pegram May 11 '11 at 18:14
    
Is there any need to preserve the order of notes or are you just looking for the resulting list, no matter the order? –  Benjamin Podszun May 11 '11 at 18:16
    
The order does not matter, merely the existence of the proper notes in the final compilation. –  Ciel May 11 '11 at 18:22
    
And it's a given that you don't have weird edge cases? Like 1, Unique / 1, Right (which one wins? Same for the other way around, 1, Left / 1, Unique? What about 1, Left / 1, Right?). –  Benjamin Podszun May 11 '11 at 19:06

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I think you should decompose the problem in smaller parts. For example, you can implement the cascade rules for an individual list in a seperate extension method. Here's my untested take at it:

public static IEnumerable<Note> ApplyCascades(this IEnumerable<Note> notes)
    {
        var uniques = new HashSet<Note>();
        Note rightToYield = null;
        foreach (var n in notes)
        {
            bool leftYielded = false;

            if (n.Cascade == Cascade.All) yield return n;
            if (n.Cascade == Cascade.Left && !leftYielded)
            {
                yield return n;
                leftYielded = true;
            }
            if (n.Cascade == Cascade.Right)
            {
                rightToYield = n;
            }
            if (n.Cascade == Cascade.Unique && !uniques.Contains(n))
            {
                yield return n;
                uniques.Add(n);
            } 
        }

        if (rightToYield != null) yield return rightToYield;
    } 
}

This method would allow to implement the original extension method something like this:

    List<Note> Composite(IList<IList<Note>> notes)
    {
        var result = from list in notes
                     from note in list.ApplyCascades()
                     select note;
        return result.ToList();

    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thats much better than using linq statements to solve this. But I think you need if (n.Cascade == Cascade.Unique && !uniques.Add(n))) instead –  Magnus May 11 '11 at 19:39
    
@Magnus thanks, fixed (needed to Add the notes to the HashSet) –  jeroenh May 11 '11 at 20:37
    
Thanks, this works well enough. I am disappointed that it cannot be done in a single LINQ query, though. –  Ciel May 12 '11 at 13:23

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