Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What happens with this type of scenario?

SET XACT_ABORT ON

BEGIN TRANSACTION

    ---DO SOMETHING HERE THAT CAUSES AN ERROR

COMMIT TRANSACTION

if @@error != 0
raiserror('SP failed. Step 7.', 20, -1) with log GO

My guess is that because XACT_ABORT is ON the COMMIT TRANSACTION never happens (because the whole thing is rolled back and terminated), and neither does the last statement (checking for @@error and then calling raiseerror).

share|improve this question

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Correct.

SET XACT_ABORT jumps out of the batch. Your IF is part of the same batch.

If you want some processing on error, then use BEGIN TRY etc

SET XACT_ABORT ON
BEGIN TRY
BEGIN TRANSACTION

    ---DO SOMETHING HERE THAT CAUSES AN ERROR

COMMIT TRANSACTION
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    raiserror('SP failed. Step 7.', 20, -1) with log
END CATCH
GO

I'm also intrigued by severity 20 because it breaks the connection. Usually you'd use 16 which is user defined error.

share|improve this answer
    
@gbn: Thanks. Because that was in a try...catch...if there are statements after that, they will execute, correct? And if they do, will they react to xact_abort the same way, ie. will xact_abort apply to every transaction in the SP? Or just the first one? Sounds like a dumb question I know but I just want to be sure. –  richard May 11 '11 at 19:22
    
And just to clarify . . . without the try/catch, the whole thing terminates, no statements after are going to be executed. With a try/catch, it will abort just that transaction, but then move on to the next statement? –  richard May 11 '11 at 19:23
    
XACT_ABORT ON applies to the whole scope/batch. Which is a stored proc. And yes, code after the CATCH executes –  gbn May 11 '11 at 19:24
    
To your 2nd comment: you need TRY/CATCH for predictable behaviour which means "error handling like I'd expect". Without T/C you get it is "batch aborting" which means "no more code runs" –  gbn May 11 '11 at 19:24
    
@gbn: Thanks! Severity 20 because I want everything to stop. This is a data warehouse transaction import SP and I want to rollback to the previous state of the database if there is an error. I don't want any half-updates. Any suggestions? Should I do something else instead of severity 20? –  richard May 11 '11 at 19:26

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.