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Real-life case (from caff) to exemplify the short question subject:

$CONFIG{'owner'} = q{Peter Palfrader};
$CONFIG{'email'} = q{peter@palfrader.org};
$CONFIG{'keyid'} = [ qw{DE7AAF6E94C09C7F 62AF4031C82E0039} ];
$CONFIG{'keyserver'} = 'wwwkeys.de.pgp.net';
$CONFIG{'mailer-send'} = [ 'testfile' ];

Then in the code: eval `cat $config`, access %CONFIG


Provide answers that lay out the general problems, not only specific to the example.

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5  
Tagged language-agnostic because this is possible in dynamic languages, and in principle in all. Tagged Perl specifically because it gladly gives you enough proverbial rope, writing this sort of scheme above is very easy. Related: stackoverflow.com/questions/746972/… –  daxim May 11 '11 at 19:17
4  
You could follow how JSON came about. Someone notices that you can deliver data into a Javascript environment by exactly this technique, run code that evaluates to the object containing the data. They immediately realize that this is way too permissive, so they specify a "safe" subset of Javascript so that you can use a familiar syntax, with results exactly the same as if you had run equivalent Javascript, but without the opportunity to mix code in with your data, and hence the result is easier to reason about (has no side effects, etc). –  Steve Jessop May 11 '11 at 21:07
    
At my site we have adopted a tool called Chef for deployments - its config files, called "recipes", have elaborate syntax that is practically a language in its own right –  Gaius May 14 '11 at 12:28
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10 Answers

up vote 26 down vote accepted

There are many reasons to avoid configuration in code, and I go through some of them in the configuration chapter in Mastering Perl.

  • No configuration change should carry the risk of breaking the program. It certainly shouldn't carry the risk of breaking the compilation stage.
  • People shouldn't have to edit the source to get a different configuration.
  • People should be able to share the same application without using a common group of settings, instead re-installing the application just to change the configuration.
  • People should be allowed to create several different configurations and run them in batches without having to edit the source.
  • You should be able to test your application under different settings without changing the code.
  • People shouldn't have to learn how to program to be able to use your tool.
  • You should only loosely tie your configuration data structures to the source of the information to make later architectural changes easier.
  • You really want an interface instead of direct access at the application level.

I sum this up in my Mastering Perl class by telling people that the first rule of programming is to create a situation where you do less work and people leave you alone. When you put configuration in code, you spend more time dealing with installation issues and responding to breakages. Unless you like that sort of thing, give people a way to change the settings without causing you more work.

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"People should have to learn how to program to be able to use your tool." =~ s/should/shouldn't/ –  Narveson May 12 '11 at 14:57
    
I don't agree with almost all of these You should or People should listed here. –  René Nyffenegger Apr 30 '12 at 4:44
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Many programmers don't agree, which is why most non-programmers hate having to talk to programmers about anything. –  brian d foy Apr 30 '12 at 21:35
    
one weak pro for inline configuration is allowing a portable single file solution. Use sane defaults and allow them to be overridden in a config file and/or cmdline and that pro is moot. –  spazm Jun 27 '12 at 1:33
    
You can still have a non-code configuration string that acts as the default file. Still, as you say, you need defaults anyway. –  brian d foy Jun 27 '12 at 3:00
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My main problem with configuration in many small scripts I write, is that they often contain login data (username and password or auth-token) to a service I use. Then later, when the scripts gets bigger, I start versioning it and want to upload it on github.

So before every commit I need to replace my configuration with some dummy values.

$CONFIG{'user'} = 'username';
$CONFIG{'password'} = '123456';

Also you have to be careful, that those values did not eventually slip into your commit history at some point. This can get very annoying. When you went through this one or two times, you will never again try to put configuration into code.

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Reason 1. Aesthetics. While no one gets harmed by bad smell, people tend to put effort into getting rid of it.

Reason 2. Operational cost. For a team of 5 this is probably ok, but once you have developer/sysadmin separation, you must hire sysadmins who understand Perl (which is $$$), or give developers access to production system (big $$$).

And to make matters worse you won't have time (also $$$) to introduce a configuration engine when you suddenly need it.

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3  
R1 is not an explanation. Why/for what reason do people consider this a smell/unaesthetic? –  daxim May 12 '11 at 8:42
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Excuse the long code listing. Below is a handy Conf.pm module that I have used in many systems which allows you to specify different variables for different production, staging and dev environments. Then I build my programs to either accept the environment parameters on the command line, or I store this file outside of the source control tree so that never gets over written.

The AUTOLOAD provides automatic methods for variable retrieval.

# Instructions:
# use Conf;
# my $c = Conf->new("production");
# print $c->root_dir;
# print $c->log_dir;

package Conf;
use strict;
our $AUTOLOAD;

my $default_environment = "production";

my @valid_environments  = qw(
    development
    production
);

#######################################################################################
# You might need to change this.
sub set_vars {
    my ($self) = @_;

    $self->{"access_token"} = 'asdafsifhefh';

    if ( $self->env eq "development" ) {
       $self->{"root_dir"}       = "/Users/patrickcollins/Documents/workspace/SysG_perl";
       $self->{"server_base"}    = "http://localhost:3000";
    }

    elsif ($self->env eq "production" ) {
       $self->{"root_dir"}       = "/mnt/SysG-production/current/lib";
       $self->{"server_base"}    = "http://api.SysG.com";
       $self->{"log_dir"}        = "/mnt/SysG-production/current/log"
    }  else {
            die "No environment defined\n";
    }

    #######################################################################################
    # You shouldn't need to configure this.

    # More dirs. Move these into the dev/prod sections if they're different per env.
    my $r = $self->{'root_dir'};
    my $b = $self->{'server_base'};

    $self->{"working_dir"} ||= "$r/working";
    $self->{"bin_dir"}     ||= "$r/bin";
    $self->{"log_dir"}     ||= "$r/log";

    # Other URLs. Move these into the dev/prod sections if they're different per env.

    $self->{"new_contract_url"}   = "$b/SysG-training-center/v1/contract/new";
    $self->{"new_documents_url"}  = "$b/SysG-training-center/v1/documents/new";

}

#######################################################################################
# Code, don't change below here.

sub new {
    my ($class,$env) = @_;
    my $self = {};
    bless ($self,$class);

    if ($env) {
            $self->env($env);
    } else {
            $self->env($default_environment);
    }

    $self->set_vars;
    return $self;
}

sub AUTOLOAD {
    my ($self,$val) = @_;
    my $type = ref ($self) || die "$self is not an object";
    my $field = $AUTOLOAD;

    $field =~ s/.*://;

    #print "field: $field\n";

    unless (exists $self->{$field} || $field =~ /DESTROY/ )
    {
       die "ERROR: {$field} does not exist in object/class $type\n";
    }

    $self->{$field} = $val if ($val);
    return $self->{$field};

}

sub env {
    my ($self,$in) = @_;
    if ($in) {
            die ("Invalid environment $in") unless (grep($in,@valid_environments));
            $self->{"_env"} = $in;
    }
    return $self->{"_env"};
}

1;
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1  
In a discussion of "Why is it a bad idea to write configuration data in code?" you have provided an example of doing exactly that. And it is an excellent example of why it is a bad idea, because this code is an opaque, needlessly complicated mess. –  dan1111 Feb 11 '13 at 14:09
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I agree with Tim Anderson. Somebody here confuses configuration in code as configuration not being configurable. This is corrected for compiled code.

Both a perl or ruby file is read and interpreted, as is a yml file or xml file with configuration data. I choose yml because it is easier on the eye than in code, as grouping by test environment, development, staging and production, which in code would involve more .. code.

As a side note, XML contradicts the "easy on the eye" completely. I find it interesting that XML config is extensively used with compiled languages.

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A reason I'm surprised no one mentioned yet is testing. When config is in the code you have to write crazy, contorted tests to be able to test safely. You can end up writing tests that duplicate the code they test which makes the tests nearly useless; mostly just testing themselves, likely to drift, and difficult to maintain.

Hand in hand with testing is deployment which was mentioned. When something is easy to test, it is going to be easy (well, easier) to deploy.

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Well, I mentioned it. :) –  brian d foy Apr 30 '12 at 21:38
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One major issue with this approach is that your config is not very portable. If a functionally identical tool were built in Java, loading configuration would have to be redone. If both the Perl and the Java variation used a simple key=value layout such as:

owner = "Peter Palfrader"
email = "peter@peter@palfrader.org"
...

they could share the config.

Also, calling eval on the config file seems to open this system up to attack. What could a malicious person add to this config file if they wanted to wreak some havoc? Do you realize that ANY arbitrary code in your config file will be executed?

Another issue is that it's highly counter-intuitive (at least to me). I would expect a config file to be read by some config loader, not executed as a runnable piece of code. This isn't so serious but could confuse new developers who aren't used to it.

Finally, while it's highly unlikely that the implementation of constructs like p{...} will ever change, if they did change, this might fail to continue to function.

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The thing is, tho', that that is valid syntax in many languages. In that case the config would be loaded by "source"ing the file. –  Gaius May 14 '11 at 12:27
3  
@Gaius: It may be valid syntax but that certainly doesn't mean it will be eval'd to load it. A .properties file in Java is of the form key=value but it is not executed as if it were code. If I were doing this in Perl, I'd attempt a similar approach of parsing the file line by line and storing the data in some structure, and not simply executing it as if it were code. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner May 16 '11 at 13:46
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The main issue here is reusability in an environment where multiple languages are possible. If your config file is in language A, then you want to share this configuration with language B, you will have to do some rewriting.

This is even more complicated if you have more complex configurations (example the apache config files) and are trying to figure out how to handle potential differences in data structures. If you use something like JSON, YAML, etc., parsers in the language will be aware of how to map things with regards to the data structures of the language.

The one major drawback of not having them in a language, is that you lose the potential of utilizing setting config values to dynamic data.

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It's a bad idea to put configuration data in compiled code, because it can't be easily changed by the user. For scripts, just make sure it's separated entirely from the rest and document it nicely.

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It's also a bad idea to change configuration without at least an abbreviated life cycle. –  Axeman May 11 '11 at 19:49
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If you're going to deploy a script on multiple machines then you don't want to have to edit it on each host as you install it. Better to separate the concerns and have the logic in a script and the config in a config file. –  Grant McLean May 11 '11 at 20:58
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$CONFIG{'unhappy_employee'} = `rm -rf /`
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1  
Your review process is pretty broken if that could make it into production! And how would that not be caught in QA? –  Axeman May 11 '11 at 19:46
7  
@Axeman: Indeed, some shops DO have pretty bad processes. And if this is an internal maintenance tool only used by a handful of people, the chances of a rigorous review are even slimmer and the opportunity for this sort of thing increases. One person simply appends one line to the config file on the server, the scheduled job runs at the appointed time, and then, BAM!! –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner May 11 '11 at 19:47
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If the review process is bad, it is bad. I would simply have to add the same thing to code that wasn't reviewed. Or system( $path_to_utility_in_config ) –  Axeman May 11 '11 at 19:52
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@Axeman: With a simple text-file for configuration, this wouldn't even be an issue. –  FrustratedWithFormsDesigner May 11 '11 at 19:55
    
@FrustratedWithFormsDesigner: sure it is, because you could still obfuscate it with config properties like path_to_browser=/bin/rm\n browser_flags=-rf\n default_url=/ and put system( $konqueror_path, $browser_flags, $uninit_url || $default_url ) or something more tricky. A hole in the review process is a hole in the review process. –  Axeman May 11 '11 at 21:14
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