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I am trying to execute another command line process in parallel with the current process. However, I realize that the command line program sometimes abnormally exits, and that kills my main program as well.

// MAIN PROGRAM
pid = fork();
char *argv[] = { stuff.. };
if (pid == 0) {
    int rc = execv("command line program...", argv);
    }

// DO OTHER STUFF HERE. 

if (pid > 0) {
    waitpid(pid, 0, 0);
}

Is there any way to keep my main program running after the command line program dies abnormally? Thanks!

[UPDATE]:Yes, the main process is writing to a file where the command line is reading from, but it is a normal file, not a pipe. I receive a segfault.

It is extremely hard for me to reproduce the bug, since the child process does not crash very often. But it does happen. Randomly crashing is a known bug in the command line program, which is why I want to keep my main program alive even if the command line dies.

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Based on what you posted I don't see why your main program would die. Is this actually happening or something you are worried about happening? –  Duck May 11 '11 at 19:27
1  
Unless the parent and the child are interacting somehow, it is unlikely that the death of the child affects the parent process. Is the parent reading/writing from/to the child via a pipe? Are you getting a SIGPIPE signal perhaps? Or any other signal? –  Nordic Mainframe May 11 '11 at 19:41
    
@Duck, yet it actually happens... So you think this is the right way of doing it? –  CodeNoob May 11 '11 at 19:42
    
@Luther Blissett: Thanks for your reply. Yes, the main process is writing to a file where the command line is reading from, but it is a normal file, not a pipe. I receive a segfault. –  CodeNoob May 11 '11 at 19:44
    
@usfish: are you using file locking? –  0xC0000022L May 11 '11 at 19:45

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

In your real code do you have an else here:

if (pid == 0) {
    int rc = execv("command line program...", argv);
    // possibly more child stuff
}
else {
    // parent stuff
}

It's always a good idea to post real code when asking questions here.

share|improve this answer
  • Use vfork rather than fork to avoid unnecessary process cloning.
  • Make sure you don't crash when SIGCHLD is received by parent process.
  • Use proper if-then-else statement to make it clear what code executes in parent process and what happens in a child process. For example it is very likely that both child and process will execute code where // DO OTHER STUFF HERE. comment is in case execv fails.
  • After all, use gdb. It will tell you where the crash occurs.
share|improve this answer
    
I think it should still be noted that vfork does not exist on all unixoid systems according to APUE (Stevens, Rago), though it does on Linux and some other popular unixoid systems. –  0xC0000022L May 11 '11 at 20:56
    
POSIX has posix_spawn() to replace vfork(). –  ninjalj May 11 '11 at 21:05

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