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I simply want to remove duplicates from two lists and combine them into one list. I also need to be able to define what a duplicate is. I define a duplicate by the ColumnIndex property, if they are the same, they are duplicates. Here is the approach I took:

I found a nifty example of how to write inline comparers for the random occassions where you need em only once in a code segment.

public class InlineComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
{
    private readonly Func<T, T, bool> getEquals;
    private readonly Func<T, int> getHashCode;

    public InlineComparer(Func<T, T, bool> equals, Func<T, int> hashCode)
    {
        getEquals = equals;
        getHashCode = hashCode;
    }

    public bool Equals(T x, T y)
    {
        return getEquals(x, y);
    }

    public int GetHashCode(T obj)
    {
        return getHashCode(obj);
    }
}

Then I just have my two lists, and attempt a union on them with the comparer.

            var formatIssues = issues.Where(i => i.IsFormatError == true);
            var groupIssues = issues.Where(i => i.IsGroupError == true);

            var dupComparer = new InlineComparer<Issue>((i1, i2) => i1.ColumnInfo.ColumnIndex == i2.ColumnInfo.ColumnIndex, 
            i => i.ColumnInfo.ColumnIndex);

            var filteredIssues = groupIssues.Union(formatIssues, dupComparer);

The result set however is null.

Where am I going astray? I have already confirmed that the two lists have columns with equal ColumnIndex properties.

share|improve this question
    
Just to get some background on this problem, have you tried debugging the code and are certain that the public bool Equals(T x, T y) method is being called and not the public int GetHashCode(T obj) method? – avanek May 11 '11 at 19:29
    
The result is really null, not an empty sequence? That would be really odd, since Enumerable.Union() should never return null. – svick May 11 '11 at 19:49
up vote 7 down vote accepted

I've just run your code on a test set.... and it works!

    public class InlineComparer<T> : IEqualityComparer<T>
    {
        private readonly Func<T, T, bool> getEquals;
        private readonly Func<T, int> getHashCode;

        public InlineComparer(Func<T, T, bool> equals, Func<T, int> hashCode)
        {
            getEquals = equals;
            getHashCode = hashCode;
        }

        public bool Equals(T x, T y)
        {
            return getEquals(x, y);
        }

        public int GetHashCode(T obj)
        {
            return getHashCode(obj);
        }
    }

    class TestClass
    {
        public string S { get; set; }
    }

    [TestMethod]
    public void testThis()
    {
        var l1 = new List<TestClass>()
                     {
                         new TestClass() {S = "one"},
                         new TestClass() {S = "two"},
                     };
        var l2 = new List<TestClass>()
                     {
                         new TestClass() {S = "three"},
                         new TestClass() {S = "two"},
                     };

        var dupComparer = new InlineComparer<TestClass>((i1, i2) => i1.S == i2.S, i => i.S.GetHashCode());

        var unionList = l1.Union(l2, dupComparer);

        Assert.AreEqual(3, unionList);
    }

So... maybe go back and check your test data - or run it with some other test data?

After all - for a Union to be empty - that suggests that both your input lists are also empty?

share|improve this answer
    
You are correct. I doubled checked the Column Indices and none are equal. Brian fart moment. I needed to make comparisons based on an Id column instead. This helped me get past my idiot block so it gets the answer vote =P – Feisty Mango May 11 '11 at 20:24

Would the Linq Except method not do it for you?

var formatIssues = issues.Where(i => i.IsFormatError == true);
var groupIssues = issues.Where(i => i.IsGroupError == true);

var dupeIssues = issues.Where(i => issues.Except(new List<Issue> {i})
                                        .Any(x => x.ColumnIndex == i.ColumnIndex));

var filteredIssues = formatIssues.Union(groupIssues).Except(dupeIssues);
share|improve this answer
    
urmm... but this remove both values, dupe removal typically you want to keep one of them. I think you meant to say formatIssues.Union(groupIssues.Except(dupeIssues)); – Simon_Weaver Jun 7 '15 at 9:40

A slightly simpler way - and yes it does preserve the original order removing 2nd and subsequent dupes.

formatIssues.Union(groupIssues).DistinctBy(x => x.ColumnIndex)

This is the DistinctBy lambda method from MoreLinq

public static IEnumerable<TSource> DistinctBy<TSource, TKey>
     (this IEnumerable<TSource> source, Func<TSource, TKey> keySelector)
{
    HashSet<TKey> knownKeys = new HashSet<TKey>();
    foreach (TSource element in source)
    {
        if (knownKeys.Add(keySelector(element)))
        {
            yield return element;
        }
    }
}
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