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I'm implementing an event-oriented layer over Java's Sockets, and I was wondering if there was a way to determine if there is data pending to read.

My normal approach would be to read from the socket into a buffer, and call the provided callbacks when the buffer is filled over a given amount of bytes (which could be 0, if the callback needs to be fired every time anything arrives), but I suspect Java is already doing the buffering for me.

Is the available() method of InputStream reliable for this? Should I just read() and do my own buffering on top of the Socket? Or is there another way?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Shortly put, no. available() is not reliable (at least it was not for me). I recommend using java.nio.channels.SocketChannel connected with Selector and SelectionKey. This solution is somewhat event-based, but is more complicated than just plain sockets.

For clients:

  1. Construct socket channel (socket), open a selector (selector = Selector.open();).
  2. Use non-blocking socket.configureBlocking(false);
  3. Register selector for connections socket.register(selector, SelectionKey.OP_CONNECT);
  4. Connect socket.connect(new InetSocketAddress(host, port));
  5. See if there is anything new selector.select();
  6. If the "new" refers to successful connection, register the selector for OP_READ; if the "new" refers to data available, just read from the socket.

However, in order to have it asynchronous you would need to set up a separate thread (despite the socket being created as non-blocked, the thread will block anyway) that checks whether something has arrived or not.

For servers, there is ServerSocketChannel and you use OP_ACCEPT for it.

For reference, this is my code (client), should give you a hint:

 private Thread readingThread = new ListeningThread();

 /**
  * Listening thread - reads messages in a separate thread so the application does not get blocked.
  */
 private class ListeningThread extends Thread {
  public void run() {
   running = true;
   try {
    while(!close) listen();
    messenger.close();
   }
   catch(ConnectException ce) {
    doNotifyConnectionFailed(ce);
   }
   catch(Exception e) {
//    e.printStackTrace();
    messenger.close();
   }
   running = false;
  }
 }

 /**
  * Connects to host and port.
  * @param host Host to connect to.
  * @param port Port of the host machine to connect to.
  */
 public void connect(String host, int port) {
  try {
   SocketChannel socket = SocketChannel.open();
   socket.configureBlocking(false);
   socket.register(this.selector, SelectionKey.OP_CONNECT);
   socket.connect(new InetSocketAddress(host, port));
  }
  catch(IOException e) {
   this.doNotifyConnectionFailed(e);
  }
 }

 /**
  * Waits for an event to happen, processes it and then returns.
  * @throws IOException when something goes wrong.
  */
 protected void listen() throws IOException {
  // see if there are any new things going on
  this.selector.select();
  // process events
  Iterator<SelectionKey> iter = selector.selectedKeys().iterator();
  while(iter.hasNext()) {
   SelectionKey key = iter.next();
   iter.remove();
   // check validity
   if(key.isValid()) {
    // if connectable...
    if(key.isConnectable()) {
     // ...establish connection, make messenger, and notify everyone
     SocketChannel client = (SocketChannel)key.channel();
     // now this is tricky, registering for OP_READ earlier causes the selector not to wait for incoming bytes, which results in 100% cpu usage very, very fast
     if(client!=null && client.finishConnect()) {
      client.register(this.selector, SelectionKey.OP_READ);
     }
    }
    // if readable, tell messenger to read bytes
    else if(key.isReadable() && (SocketChannel)key.channel()==this.messenger.getSocket()) {
     // read message here
    }
   }
  }
 }

 /**
  * Starts the client.
  */
 public void start() {
  // start a reading thread
  if(!this.running) {
   this.readingThread = new ListeningThread();
   this.readingThread.start();
  }
 }

 /**
  * Tells the client to close at nearest possible moment.
  */
 public void close() {
  this.close = true;
 }

And for server:

 /**
  * Constructs a server.
  * @param port Port to listen to.
  * @param protocol Protocol of messages.
  * @throws IOException when something goes wrong.
  */
 public ChannelMessageServer(int port) throws IOException {
  this.server = ServerSocketChannel.open();
  this.server.configureBlocking(false);
  this.server.socket().bind(new InetSocketAddress(port));
  this.server.register(this.selector, SelectionKey.OP_ACCEPT);
 }

 /**
  * Waits for event, then exits.
  * @throws IOException when something goes wrong.
  */
 protected void listen() throws IOException {
  // see if there are any new things going on
  this.selector.select();
  // process events
  Iterator<SelectionKey> iter = selector.selectedKeys().iterator();
  while(iter.hasNext()) {
   SelectionKey key = iter.next();
   // do something with the connected socket
   iter.remove();
   if(key.isValid()) this.process(key);
  }
 }

 /**
  * Processes a selection key.
  * @param key SelectionKey.
  * @throws IOException when something is wrong.
  */
 protected void process(SelectionKey key) throws IOException {
  // if incoming connection
  if(key.isAcceptable()) {
   // get client
   SocketChannel client = (((ServerSocketChannel)key.channel()).accept());
    try {
     client.configureBlocking(false);
     client.register(this.selector, SelectionKey.OP_READ);
    }
    catch(Exception e) {
     // catch
    }
  }
  // if readable, tell messenger to read
  else if(key.isReadable()) {
  // read
  }
 }

Hope this helps.

share|improve this answer
    
I do not understand. You don't need a separate thread. Non-blocking sockets don't block by definition.Just use OP_READ correctly, and a correct read loop that stops when read returns zero. –  EJP May 11 '11 at 23:51
    
@EJP: Not disagreeing; however it seemed to me that, regardless of the blocking, the reading from the socket still blocked, even if there was nothing to read. Might be that I did something wrong, though. I suggest the asker to try as you say, and in case it does not work - try the threads. –  Sorrow May 12 '11 at 6:41
    
what you almost certainly did was loop while read() returned zero. That's why I mentioned it. That's not blocking, that's looping. –  EJP May 12 '11 at 7:05

available() will only tell you if you can read data without going to the OS. Its not very useful here.

You can either do a blocking, or non-blocking read as you prefer. A non-blocking read just returns when there is no data to read so that may be what you want.

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2  
Incorrect. available() will tell you the sum of the data in the BufferedInputStream/BufferedReader, if you're using one, and the socket receive buffer, which is a kernel data structure. If the data is only in the socket receive buffer you would have to 'go to the OS' to get it but you won't block in the process. As the Javadoc says. However if it is for example an SSLSocket, available() always returns zero. –  EJP May 11 '11 at 23:52

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