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I have implemented the following class:

public class ClassAllocator<T>
    where T : new()
{
    public delegate T Allocator();
    T obj;
    Allocator allocator = () => new T();

    public ClassAllocator( T obj )
    {
        this.obj = obj;
    }

    public ClassAllocator( T obj, Allocator allocator )
    {
        this.obj = obj;
        this.allocator = allocator;
    }

    public T Instance
    {
        get
        {
            if( obj == null )
            {
                obj = allocator();
            }

            return obj;
        }
    }
}

I feel like something this simple & useful should be in .NET somewhere. Also, I realize that the class I made is somewhat incorrect. The class is designed to work with objects that don't have a default constructor, yet my 'where' clause requires it in all cases.

Let me know if there is something in .NET I can use so I can get rid of this class, as I would hate to continue using a reinvented wheel.

Thanks!!!!

UPDATE:

I'm using .NET 3.5. Sorry I didn't mention this before, I wasn't aware it was relevant until a few good answers started flowing in :)

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2 Answers 2

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Sounds like you're looking for the Lazy<T> Class.

Lazy<T> Class

Provides support for lazy initialization.

Lazy initialization occurs the first time the Lazy<T>.Value property is accessed

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The Lazy class is only in .NET 4.0, I'm using version 3.5. So I won't be able to use this class. –  void.pointer May 11 '11 at 20:07
    
@Robert Dailey: Have a look at bluebytesoftware.com/blog/2007/06/09/… –  dtb May 11 '11 at 20:42

The Lazy class

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The Lazy class is only in .NET 4.0, I'm using version 3.5. So I won't be able to use this class. –  void.pointer May 11 '11 at 20:06

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