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I'm learning Objective-C. In my first non-trivial project I've run into a question about how to best handle resources passed to the initializer, compared to the default initializer. My class has a retained resource, engine, which can be set manually after creation, or during initialization explicitly, or during initialization by default:

- (id)init {
    if ((self = [super init])) {
        id e = [[XorShiftEngine alloc] init];
        [self setEngine: e];
        [e release];
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)initWithEngine:(NSObject <RandEngine> *)e {
    if ((self = [super init]))
        [self setEngine: e];
    return self;
}

- (id)setEngine:(NSObject <RandEngine> *)newEngine {
    [newEngine retain];
    [engine release];
    engine = newEngine;
    // Some other stuff which needs to happen on changing the engine.
    return engine;
}

The default initializer, in particular, seems very ugly to me, interleaving code relevant to the self, then the member, then self again, then the member again, and naming the object solely to be able to release it later. It also violates the designated initializer idiom.

Is there a more idiomatic way to do this, without using autorelease pools?

share|improve this question
    
Just out of curiosity, what's wrong with autorelease pools? – Tamás May 11 '11 at 20:18
    
You'll also want to avoid lots of activity triggered by directly calling the set*: methods; it'll make refactoring and optimization less difficult. – bbum May 11 '11 at 20:20
    
@Tamás: It seems the wrong approach. I am not using the engine as a temporary variable; it is long-lived, and owned by the implementation shown here. – user79758 May 11 '11 at 20:27
1  
Note also that calling the setters from within your init methods can be rife with danger in that the object's initialization means that the object is not yet fully setup. You'll incur unpleasant dependencies that'll make sub-classing significantly harder. – bbum May 11 '11 at 20:55
up vote 2 down vote accepted
- (id)init {
    id e = [[XorShiftEngine alloc] init];
    self = [self initWithEngine: e];
    [e release];
    return self;
}

// designated initializer
- (id)initWithEngine:(NSObject <RandEngine> *)e {
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil) {
        engine = [e retain];
        // engine initialization stuff
    }
    return self;
}

- (id)setEngine:(NSObject <RandEngine> *)newEngine {
    [newEngine retain];
    [engine release];
    engine = newEngine;
    // Some other stuff which needs to happen on changing the engine.
    return engine;
}

You've done basically the right thing. The only thing I would change is directly assigning the variable and retaining it rather than calling the setter in the init method.

Apple recommends not calling property setters/getters in the init and dealloc methods (I'm assuming you've declared a retain property and are just overriding the setter).

If you have engine customization code that needs to happen the first time the engine is set in the initializer as well as whenever it is changed, then you should refactor this out into a separate method.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there a standard naming convention for such refactors? engineWasSet? – user79758 May 11 '11 at 20:56
    
+1, especially for the note about not using setters inside of init. – Josh Caswell May 11 '11 at 20:58

Are you talking about e in -init? I don't see the problem there... you create an object, you use it, you release it. That's the usual and correct pattern for creating and using objects. If you're unhappy with that, though, you could instead have -init pass nil into -initWithEngine: and have -initWithEngine: create the engine if none is provided.

People don't usually talk about a "default initializer" so much as a "designated initializer." The designated initializer is the one that all the other initializers call -- it's often one that allows for the most customization. In this case, -initWithEngine: is your designated initializer.

share|improve this answer
- init
{
    self = [super init];
    if (self != nil) {
        // initialization here
    }
    return self;
}

If you have "cover initializers", they should follow the same pattern:

- initWithBob:(Bob*)aBob
{
   self = [self init];
   if ( self != nil ) {
       ... deal with aBob here ...
   }
   return self;
}

This is also a good example of why it is wise to avoid multiple initializers on a class. It can be a pain to keep track and makes subclassing more tedious and error prone. Better to have one initializer and multiple subclasses or have a single initializer and allow the instances to be configured after the fact.

I.e. instead of initWithBob:, have @property(retain) Bob* bob; that can be called after init as needed. Limiting initializers to required state is a good rule of thumb.


Assuming you are declaring a Car class, I'd do something like:

@interface Car:NSObject
+ car;
+ carWithEngine:(Engine*)anEngine;
- initWithEngine:(Engine*)anEngine;
@end

The implementations should be obvious; car creates a default engine and calls alloc/initWithEngine:/autorelease.

That gives you a single initializer, making sub-classing dead simple obvious.

share|improve this answer
    
That would actually make the default initializer even longer and more interleaved. It also makes the designated initialization idiom fail. – user79758 May 11 '11 at 20:15
1  
Downvoted for recommending that you follow the well documented patterns? :) Initializers are a special case -- one of the few -- see developer.apple.com/library/ios/#documentation/Cocoa/Conceptual/… – bbum May 11 '11 at 20:18
1  
@Joe Wreschnig, you're not throwing out the engine that you create in -init. You're passing it into -initWithEngine:, where it will be retained. All you're doing by releasing the engine that you create in -init is giving up -init's interest in/ownership of the engine. Now, it could be that -initWithEngine: will copy that object or otherwise not be interested in the engine that you pass in, but from the point of view of -init you don't care about that. (Whether you're endeared to the language or not is your own issue to work out.) – Caleb May 11 '11 at 20:32
1  
@Joe: your update to init doesn't make any sense. You shouldn't assign self to the result of setIvar:. Setter methods don't usually return anything; they just set the ivar, managing memory as necessary. Your statement about a heap object seems to indicate a misunderstanding of the memory management. If, in your class here, you allocate an Engine object and then also retain it (creating two "claims" on the engine), you must release it once or you will end up with a leak. You're not creating something and immediately throwing it away; you're just counting references. – Josh Caswell May 11 '11 at 20:33
1  
@Joe: I missed that comment by Tamás. He has it backwards. All initializers, including plain init, should call through to the "designated initializer", which is usually the one with the most arguments. The designated initializer is the only one which should call [super init]. So, init should simply return the result of passing a default value to initWithEngine:, which should return the result of passing a default value to initWithEngine:andFoo:, etc., the last one in the chain being the designated initializer. As bbum said, though, lots of initializers is usually not the right way. – Josh Caswell May 11 '11 at 20:48

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