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In my html I was curious if it was semantically correct to use unique identifiers such as <toys> </toys> to hold an image rather than an <h2>. For example:

Is it preferred to have: <toys class="grid_4 push_2">&nbsp</toys>

with the css:

    toys {
    background: url("toys.png") no-repeat scroll 0 0 transparent;
    width: 181px;
    height: 93px;
    margin-top: -8px;
    }

instead of: I currently have: <h1 class="grid_4 push_2">&nbsp</h1>

with the css:

    h1 {
    background: url("toys.png") no-repeat scroll 0 0 transparent;
    width: 181px;
    height: 93px;
    margin-top: -8px;
    }

Is the use of unique identifiers like <toys> semantically correct?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 8 down vote accepted

It is best to avoid using custom tags, as you never know when those tags may become standardized, and have special usage in the future.

The best thing to do for your example, if you want to avoid using the header tags, is the following:

<div class="toys grid_4 push_2">&nbsp</div>

.toys {
    background: url("toys.png") no-repeat scroll 0 0 transparent;
    width: 181px;
    height: 93px;
    margin-top: -8px;
}

In addition:

If you do not use standard html tags when designing pages, they will not appear in any organized manner when styles are disabled. This is not a problem, going forward, but if for any reason you needed to view a list of "toys" without styles, you had be out of luck unless you use <ul> or <ol> with <li> tags.

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Thanks for that. You clarified the issues that might crop up as a result of using custom html tags. –  Noob May 11 '11 at 23:14
6  
so I ask.. what is the point of having tags at all? shouldn't they provide semantic meaning? Funny that XHTML stands for EXTENSIBLE HTML and yet everyone always freaked when you extended it and your markup didnt validate. –  lukemh Dec 9 '11 at 2:12
4  
I don't know any great web developers who think XHTML is better than standard, properly formatted, closed-tag HTML. In fact, I'm sure a lot of new developers think XHTML stands for XML-HTML, in that it adheres more closely to XML standards than previous HTML standards. To answer your question, tags do in fact provide semantic meaning. An HTML document is a view of some data. It is not the data itself. Therefore, the tags provide semantic meaning for the way in which they display the data they represent. "div" means division, "p" means paragraph, "section" means section, etc. –  Christopher Harris Nov 8 '12 at 16:40

Most of these responses are good general advice, but not proper answers to the question, which i think is perfectly legitimate.

HTML5 is already a moving target; browsers implement specs and innovate at different paces. There is no single thing called "valid HTML", at least not that is worth using. If you are building a public page for every person and bot/crawler on the planet, then you already either have to A) detect the client and customize accordingly, for complex/advanced pages or B) make it really, really simple and plain. If, on the other hand, you're putting it on a LAN or hiding it behind a login wall or developing on the cutting edge and plan for frequent updates anyway, then you should feel free to innovate a bit, with discretion. Browser devs and spec writers cater to their needs, you can do the same.

So, if you want a custom tag, choose carefully (here i will point out that the odds that would ever become part of a formal spec of browser implementation are totally negligible), then go for it. To make your CSS work in IE, though, you will have to do as html5shim does and call document.createElement('toys') in your javascript.

I should also add that custom elements are getting their own standards and support, but the consensus currently is that they all should have a '-' in the name. So i would recommend something like 'x-toys' or 'my-toys' instead of just 'toys'. Personally, i'm not thrilled with the convention, but i understand the reasons.

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Great answer, especially the bit about the createElement() call for Internet Explorer browsers. –  Cypher Oct 11 '13 at 22:21

You certainly can; however, it's generally not a good idea to do so. In many ways HTML5 is moving to something like that but genericized; having specific tags, while supported can have very different results among different browsers.

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Yes, that would be semantically correct.

However, it's invalid syntax as HTML has a defined set of tags.

You can get around that in some browsers.

That said, what's the benefit of doing that? It really would only benefit the person that has to maintain the source code.

FYI, what you are proposing is pretty much what XML is.

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You don't want to make up your own tags.

The HTML tags are defined in the HTML specification.

In stead of:

<h1 class="grid_4 push_2">&nbsp</h1>

You should do something like:

<h1 class="toys">&nbsp</h1>

However you can make up you own tags if XML.

But please note that not all browser support your tag and you won't be able to style them using CSS.

Same thing is happening with new HTML5 tags

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UPDATE (because all the answers are old):

As of Web components API gets implemented in every major browser, in my opinion, you can't avoid using custom tags in the future. I think Web Components will easily become mainstream. The whole theory is built on it: Custom tags, custom attributes custom JS attached to these elements.

So what i say: it isn't a bad thing to use your own tags nowadays but you still need to consider SEO related building.

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I agree wih superUntiled, you should make good use of the CSS selectors (classes and IDs). So if you have an object of type "toy", you should create a class for that object. Then you could select all your cars using CSS just using the selector .toy.

Something like this:

<style>
.toy {
    color: red;
}
</style>

<p class="toy">My little car</p>
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If your doctype is set to XHTML, you should be fine. But it's generally not valid for HTML doctypes.

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XHTML is old style. Check up on HTML5 specs. –  BerggreenDK Jun 16 '11 at 9:47
    
@BerggreenDK: I understand that and never did recommend using it. –  Shaz Jun 18 '11 at 17:32

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