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If I have 2 lists of strings:

List<string> firstList = new List<string>("010", "111", "123");
List<string> secondList = new List<string>("010", "111", "999");

How can I compare each individual character in each item from the lists? Ex: Should compare "0" with "0", "1" with "1", "0" with "0" and so on. It appears that I can use SelectMany but I am stuck on how to do it

EDIT:

These lists should return true when compared with each other (as asterisk means any character and I am validating to ensure that each item is exactly 3 chars in length)

List<string> firstList = new List<string>("010", "111", "123");
List<string> secondList = new List<string>("010", "1*1", "***");
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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you just want to compare for a matching character sequence between your lists:

bool sameCharacters = Enumerable.SequenceEqual(firstList.SelectMany(x => x), 
                                               secondList.SelectMany(x => x));

This would result in true, i.e. for the following two lists - their character sequences match ("010111123" for both), their individual string entries do not:

List<string> firstList = new List<string> {"010", "111", "123" };
List<string> secondList = new List<string> {"010", "11", "1123" };

Edit in response to comments:

For a wildcard match you could use Zip() and compare each character, return true if they match based on wildcard conditions, then just check that each element in the zipped sequence is true.

var isWildCardMatch = firstList.SelectMany(x => x).Zip(secondList.SelectMany( x => x), (a,b) => { if(a==b || a =='' || b == '') return true; return false;

    }).All( x=> x);

Above approach crossed string entry boundaries, which would cause false matches - here a better approach:

bool isWildCardMatch = firstList.Zip(secondList, (x, y) =>
{
    var matchWord = y.Select((c, i) => c == '*' ? x[i] : c);
    return matchWord.SequenceEqual(x);
}).All(x => x);
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Hhm, just curious. Why would you want to make a character-based sequence-equals when sequence-equals over strings also compares the characters in the strings (as in my answer)? –  Lasse Espeholt May 11 '11 at 20:58
    
@lasseespeholt - I have special logic to add and I need to do that on a character by character comparison. –  DotnetDude May 11 '11 at 21:00
    
@lasseespeholt: Because your solution will return false in the example I give - a "character stream" based solution returns false. It appeared that this is what OP wanted, but of course I might be wrong. –  BrokenGlass May 11 '11 at 21:00
    
@BrokenGlass - If a character has an asterisk, then it should match any character. Given that, should I be breaking down the firstList.SelectMany and secondList.SelectMany and looping through them? –  DotnetDude May 11 '11 at 21:01
    
@BrokenGlass Ahh okay ;) I interpret the question in another way. I guess OP have to explain how the semantics should work then. –  Lasse Espeholt May 11 '11 at 21:02

Updated with wildcards

class WildcardStringComparer : IEqualityComparer<string>
{
    public bool Equals(string s1, string s2)
    {
        if (s1.Length != s2.Length) return false;

        for (int i = 0; i < s1.Length; i++)
        {
            if (s1[i] != s2[i] && s1[i] != '*' && s2[i] != '*')
                return false;
        }

        return true;
    }


    public int GetHashCode(string obj)
    {
        throw new NotImplementedException();
    }
}

Results:

List<string> firstList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "999"};
List<string> secondList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "999"};

bool res = firstList.SequenceEqual(secondList, new WildcardStringComparer()); // True

and

List<string> firstList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "999"};
List<string> secondList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "*99"};

bool res = firstList.SequenceEqual(secondList, new WildcardStringComparer()); // True

and

List<string> firstList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "999"};
List<string> secondList = new List<string>{"010", "111", "199"};

bool res = firstList.SequenceEqual(secondList, new WildcardStringComparer()); // False
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I'd like to compare character by character and not item by item as I have special logic I need to apply –  DotnetDude May 11 '11 at 20:59
    
@DotnetDude Okay :) Maybe you should explain in a little more detail what you want. That way you might get better answers. –  Lasse Espeholt May 11 '11 at 21:00
2  
+1: Using a custom comparer looks like the way to go in this case, looks clean. –  BrokenGlass May 11 '11 at 21:22

Assuming you want to compare the first character of the first string in the first list to the first character of the first string of the second list, the second character of the first string in the first list to the second character of the first string in the second list, etc. I can think of two implementations.

The one I would start with:

var firstCharList = new List<char>();
var secondCharList = new List<char>();

firstList.foreach(s => 
 {
   foreach(char c in s)
   {
      firstCharList.Add(c);
   }
  });

secondList.foreach(s =>
{
   foreach(char c in s)
   {
      secondCharList.Add(c);
   }
});

for(int i = 0; i < firstCharList.Length; i++)
{
   if(firstCharList[i] == secondCharList[i]) yield return i;
}

That would generate a list (or array, or whatever) of ints that correspond to indexes of which both strings had the same character.

The second would be something like:

firstList.foreach(s =>
{
   var index = firstList.IndexOf(s);
   var sPrime = secondList[index];
   for(int i = 0; i < s.Length; i++)
   {
      if(s[i] == sPrime[i]) yield return s[i];
   }
}

That one just returns any characters that are equal at the same indexes.

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