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Is there an equivalent operator to Haskell's list difference operator \\ in F#?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Was bounced, yet I believe it is worth to write here the implementation of ( /-/ ) (the F# version of Haskell's \\):

let flip f x y = f y x

let rec delete x = function
  | [] -> []
  | h :: t when x = h -> t
  | h :: t -> h :: delete x t

let inline ( /-/ ) xs ys = List.fold (flip delete) xs ys

This will operate as Haskell's \\, so that (xs @ ys) /-/ xs = ys. For example: (7 :: [1 .. 5] @ [5 .. 11]) /-/ [4 .. 7] evaluates into [1; 2; 3; 5; 7; 8; 9; 10; 11].

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Nope... Just write it and make it an infix operator --using the set of special characters. Backslash (\) is not in the list below, so it will not work as an infix operator. See the manual:

infix-op :=

or || & && <OP >OP $OP = |OP &OP ^OP :: -OP +OP *OP /OP %OP

**OP

prefix-op :=

!OP ?OP ~OP -OP +OP % %% & &&
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4  
"// will work as an infix operator". No it won't. That is a single-line comment in F#. –  Jon Harrop Feb 12 '11 at 15:05

Assuming you really want conventional set difference rather than the weird ordered-but-unsorted multiset subtraction that Haskell apparently provides, just convert the lists to sets using the built-in set function and then use the built-in - operator to compute the set difference:

set xs - set ys

For example:

> set [1..5] - set [2..4];;
val it : Set<int> = seq [1; 5]
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3  
This won't handle duplicates correctly. –  Ganesh Sittampalam Jun 18 '09 at 7:20
    
The edit still doesn't handle duplicates correctly. The \\ operator doesn't provide a set-difference behaviour, it provides a bag-difference behaviour. –  ScottWest Feb 12 '11 at 21:20
1  
@Jon I imagine it would depend on whether your underlying model is bags or sets. –  ScottWest Feb 12 '11 at 22:24
2  
The function is for lists, so there is an order. The fact that it's more specified makes it a refinement of the bag operation. –  ScottWest Feb 13 '11 at 11:19
2  
Ah, I said that this was a refinement of a bag operation. Ie, if you implemented a bag as a list you could use the // operator for lists, and it would be an implementation of the bag-difference operator. Likewise, ++ would be an implementation of the bag-sum operator. The fact that there is an order is just more information, which doesn't influence the bag interface (because it doesn't know about it anyway). –  ScottWest Feb 16 '11 at 18:14

Filter items from the set of the subtrahend:

let ( /-/ ) xs ys =
    let ySet = set ys
    let notInYSet x = not <| Set.contains x ySet
    List.filter notInYSet xs
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