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Suppose you have result set such as:

DATE          ID    cost    
---------------------------------------
 01/01/2011    1     10      
 01/01/2011    1     10      
 01/01/2011    2     10      
 01/01/2011    2     10      

I want a way to sum the values on cost but only once for every distinct ID so that when i group by date I get a result such as

DATE            cost

01/01/2011         20

I first tried something like

    sum(distinct cost) 

but that of curse only returns 10 I also tried:

sum(case when distinct id then cost else 0 end)

but that is not a functional query.

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2  
Which flavour of SQL are you using? –  Will A May 11 '11 at 22:21
    
Are the cost values always the same for a given ID? –  Chris Diver May 11 '11 at 22:31
    
This is oracle, I cannot group by date and Id, as I need 1 row per date. –  Oscar Gomez May 11 '11 at 22:33

6 Answers 6

up vote 11 down vote accepted

I will assume that the same ID will always have the same cost in the same day. I will also assume your RDBMS supports derived tables. In that case, this is what you want:

select date, sum(cost)
from 
  (select distinct date, id, cost from YourTable)
group by date

Updated

Oracle derived tables do not require alias.

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Thank you this works –  Oscar Gomez May 11 '11 at 22:37

I think all you want to do here is group by both date and id, as MPelletier wrote.

FWIW - you can do a distinct inside an aggregate in some dbs: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-functions.html#function_sum

And even better, use group by with rollup to get totals along with the grouping: http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/group-by-modifiers.html

SELECT DATE, ID, SUM(cost)
FROM table_name
GROUP BY DATE, ID WITH ROLLUP;
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Without knowing the database/SQL engine:

SELECT Date, Sum(Cost) FROM YourTable GROUP BY Date, ID;

SELECT Date, First(TCost)
FROM
(SELECT Date, Sum(Cost) as TCost FROM YourTable GROUP BY Date, ID)
GROUP BY Date
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Unless of course there's something I'm not understanding right from the question. –  MPelletier May 11 '11 at 22:27
    
with this approach you'd have two records for each date. –  Will A May 11 '11 at 22:29
    
@WillA I'm having trouble with the wording of the question, it seems. Anyways, I think @Adrian's got it. –  MPelletier May 11 '11 at 22:35

I think there is some flaw with the logic of the posted question.

Suppose you have this result set:

DATE          ID    cost    
---------------------------------------
 01/01/2011    1     10      
 01/01/2011    1     15     
 01/01/2011    2     10      
 01/01/2011    2     10      

What should the query return?

DATE          cost    
---------------------------------------
 01/01/2011    20    

or

DATE          cost    
---------------------------------------
 01/01/2011    25   

The accepted answer will return 35.

Or is such a set impossible to have?

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TRY THIS

SELECT SUM(cost) AS Expr1, ID, date FROM (SELECT DISTINCT date, ID, cost FROM table_name AS table_name_1 GROUP BY date, ID, cost) AS derivedtbl_1 GROUP BY ID, date

or THIS

SELECT SUM(cost) AS Expr1, date FROM (SELECT DISTINCT date, ID, cost FROM table_name AS table_name_1 GROUP BY date, ID, cost) AS derivedtbl_1 GROUP BY date

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Try This
DEMO TABLE(Table name is 'tablename'. id and cost is type of 'int' )

id | cost  
 1 | 15  
 1 | 25  
 1 | 10  
 2 | 25  
 2 | 5  
 2 | 10  
 3 | 20    
 3 | 15    
 3 | 10    
 4 | 20    
 4 | 20   


Query use
select id, SUM(cost) as 'Total Cost' from sumchk group by id
OR (use below one)
select id, sum(cost) as 'Total Cost'
from
(select * from tablename)a
group by id;

Result :

  id  |  Total Cost  
   1  |    50  
   2  |    40  
   3  |    45  
   4  |    40  
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