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How can I add constant acceleration to this pendulum as a whole while using this code? The code right now is describing a pendulum, how would I alter it to describe a pendulum in a moving train (where the train has a constant acceleration)? Any help would be appreciated, thank you in advance.

from math import sin, pi

from time import sleep

from turtle import *


GA = 9.80665 # Gravitational Acceleration (meters per second squared)

FORM = 'Time={:6.3f}, Angle={:6.3f}, Speed={:6.3f}'

def main():

    length = 10.0            # Of pendulum (meters)
    ngol = - GA / length    # Negative G over L
    total_time = 0.0        # Seconds
    angle = 1.0             # Initial angle of pendulum (radians)
    speed = 0.0             # Initial angular velocity (radians/second)
    time_step = 0.05        # Seconds
    acc = 1
    while total_time < 30.0:
        total_time += time_step
        speed += ngol * sin(angle) * time_step
        angle += speed * time_step
        #print(FORM.format(total_time, angle, speed))
        if draw(angle, length): break
        sleep(time_step)

def init():

    setup()
    mode('logo')
    radians()
    speed(0)
    hideturtle()
    tracer(False)
    penup()

def draw(angle, length):

    if speed() != 0: return True
    clear()
    setheading(angle + pi)
    pensize(max(round(length), 1))
    pendown()
    forward(length * 25)
    penup()
    dot(length * 10)
    home()
    update()

if __name__ == '__main__':

    init()
    main()
    bye()
share|improve this question
    
speeed += that does have constant acceleration (read "what am I missing")? –  user166390 May 11 '11 at 22:23
2  
Do you want the acceleration to be in the direction that the pendulum in currently moving or at some other angle, say downwards? –  Peter Collingridge May 11 '11 at 22:37
    
I apologize for the unclear question. I wanted to have the whole system be in a constant acceleration, instead of angular acceleration. EX: A pendulum inside a moving train. –  Arash Memarzadeh May 11 '11 at 23:45
1  
A normal train does not have constant acceleration. –  Ben Jackson May 11 '11 at 23:49
    
How many degrees of freedom exist in the pendulum joint? How does the direction of acceleration compare to the initial plane of motion of the pendulum? Do you like multivariate calculus? –  Ben Voigt May 11 '11 at 23:49
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

It seems to me that you just need to specify the horizontal position ( assuming you are on a train that is moving only in the horizontal direction ) to your draw function.

def draw(angle, length, horiz_pos):

if speed() != 0: return True
clear()
forward(horiz_pos)
setheading(angle + pi)
pensize(max(round(length), 1))
pendown()
forward(length * 25)
penup()
dot(length * 10)
home()
update()

And then modify the call to the draw() function by passing a position based on speed*time_step where speed is increasing ( i.e. accelerating ).

acc = 1
while total_time < 30.0:
    total_time += time_step
    speed_horiz += accel_constant * time_step
    speed += ngol * sin(angle) * time_step
    pos += speed_horiz * time_step
    angle += speed * time_step
    if draw(angle, length, pos): break
    sleep(time_step)
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For constant angular acceleration w(t):

acc = 1
while total_time < 30.0:
    ...
    angle += acc * speed * time_step
    acc += 0.1

Тhere is a good Simple harmonic motion wikipedia article, that describes pendulum motion.

share|improve this answer
    
I apologize for the unclear question. I wanted to have the whole system be in a constant acceleration, instead of angular acceleration. EX: A pendulum inside a moving train. –  Arash Memarzadeh May 11 '11 at 23:42
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