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I need to declare an array of arrays and so using the code below to accomplish that:

int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];//memory allocated for elements of rows
      for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++)
      {
            maxc[i] = new int[n];//memory allocated for  elements of each column.
      }

The problem is, the code above does not seem to compile. I get the following compilation error:

A value of type "int *" cannot be assigned to an entity of type "int"

Here's the full code:

//#include<math.h>
#include "stdafx.h"
#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
using namespace std;
/*
Banker's algorithm Implementation
*/
 int main(void)
 {
      int n=0;//number of resources we will  be dealing with 
      int proc_num =0;//Total number of processes to share available resources
      int* a = NULL;  // pointer to an int with initial set to point to nothing
     // int* maxc = NULL;
      int* maxR=NULL;
      int* avail = NULL;
      int* avail_temp = NULL;
      //int** alloc = NULL;
      int* unalloc = NULL;

      std::cout<<endl;
      std::cout <<" What is number of resources to be shared? :";
      cin >> n;
      std::cout<<endl;
      while(std::cin.fail())
      {
            std::cout<< " Error Please provide valid number !" <<endl;
            std::cin.clear() ;
            std::cout<<endl;
            std::cout <<" What is number of resources to be shared? :";
            cin >> n;
            std::cout<<endl;
      }

      maxR = new int[n];  // Allocate n ints and save ptr in maxc -- holds the max resources available.
      //get the maximum number of each Resources/ Ie Total Resources Available
      for(int i =0; i < n; i++)
      {
            int maxcin=0;
            std::cout << i;
            std::cout<< ". How many of resource #";
            std::cout<< i;
            std::cout<< " do you need to share ?"; 
            cin>>maxcin;
            maxR[i] = maxcin;
      }
      //<8,7,5,9>");

      std::cout<<endl;
      std::cout << "How many processes to share available resources?";
      cin>>proc_num;
      std::cout<<endl;

      int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];//memory allocated for elements of rows
      for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++)
      {
            maxc[i] = new int*[n];//memory allocated for  elements of each column.
      }
}
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1  
Is there any specific reason not to use any of the safer/more comfortable, idiomatic ways that C++ offers to achieve the same functionality as plain, multidimensional arrays? –  Jim Brissom May 11 '11 at 22:37
    
If you are attempting to write a multi-language source file I suggest you do not use new, or ::, or << (except as bitwise shift operator), or namespace, .. –  pmg May 11 '11 at 22:40
    
Can you show a complete example please? The code here has no errors, and compiles perfectly fine on my own copy of VC10(assuming proc_num and n are properly declared). –  Benjamin Lindley May 11 '11 at 22:42
    
I am taking it from this example here codeproject.com/KB/cpp/arrayDinamic.aspx –  Kobojunkie May 11 '11 at 22:42
1  
That's nice. But I still need to see your complete code, main function, includes and everything. –  Benjamin Lindley May 11 '11 at 22:45
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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You may have problems with getting the declarations correct, but your real problem is not using standard containers to do the work for you.

This code:

  int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];//memory allocated for elements of rows
  for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++)
  {
        maxc[i] = new int*[n];//memory allocated for  elements of each column.
  }

Can be corrected to this to make it compile.

  int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];
  for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++)
  {
        maxc[i] = new int[n];
             //     ^^^^ Note no star here.
  }

But it is still not good code as you are not taking into account exceptions (this code will leak if any allocation fails). During use if your code generates an exception you are going to leak all the memory.

A better solution would be:

std::vector<std::vector<int> >  maxc(proc_num, std::vector<int>(n, 0)); // even initializes all elements to 0

If you want to get fancy you look up the boost multi-dimensional array this may give you some small performance improvements (if you are doing matrix multiplication etc).

if you really want to do it by hand then I would start learning about classes and RAII.

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What the error now you get is entirely different from what you posted earlier. In the final for loop -

maxc[i] = new int*[n];

should be -

maxc[i] = new int[n];

In the snippet you earlier posted, it was correct. Also, you should deallocate resources acquired by new[] using delete[], else memory leak prevails.

share|improve this answer
    
Not at all. My code is simply as I posted above. –  Kobojunkie May 11 '11 at 23:40
    
@Kobojunkie - As every one suggested, post the entire code in your question then. There is nothing wrong in what you posted. –  Mahesh May 11 '11 at 23:43
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The problem you're encountering is in this section of the code you posted:

int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];
for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++)
{
    maxc[i] = new int*[n];
}

Inside the for-loop, you're allocating a new array of int pointers, but the original type for maxc was of type pointer-to-pointer. In this context that could also be construed to say maxc is a pointer that points to an array of pointers. That of course accomplished on the first assignment, where you return a pointer from new that is pointing to an array of int*. Therefore the statement inside the for-loop is assigning the wrong type to each array element. The type for the array elements maxc[x] are int pointers, which means that they must point to either one or more objects of type int, not elements of type int*. But your new operator in the loop is trying to allocate another array of int pointers, and return a pointer to that allocated array, meaning the type returned is int** again, and that's not correct. So you should change the inside of your loop to read:

maxc[i] = new int[n]; //allocate an array of int's, and return an int pointer

I noticed the first segment of code you posted actually does this, so maybe you're encountering a simple typo you missed?

Finally, when you delete this memory, since each row was created using new, you will have to call delete on each row representing the array of int's. Next, you will have to call delete on the column representing the array of int pointers that were pointing to the array of int's. So freeing all the memory allocated would look like the following:

for (int i=0; i < proc_num; i++)
{
    //call delete on each pointer in each column of the array that is pointing to a
    //row array of int's
    delete [] maxc[i];  
}

//call delete on the pointer pointing to the column of 
//the array that contains the original int pointers that were
//pointing to each of the row arrays of int's
delete [] maxc;
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This:

int main() {
    int proc_num = 100;
    int n = 42;
    int **  maxc = new int *[proc_num];//memory allocated for elements of rows
    for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++) {
            maxc[i] = new int[n];//memory allocated for  elements of each column.
    }
}

compiles just fine for me.

share|improve this answer
    
int proc_num = 0; int n = 0; //User provides values for proc_num and n during runtime int ** maxc = new int *[proc_num];//memory allocated for elements of rows for (int i = 0; i < proc_num; i++) { maxc[i] = new int[n];//memory allocated for elements of each column. } –  Kobojunkie May 11 '11 at 23:42
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