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I want to set two properties equal to each other in one object. Here's an example:

var obj = { // I want to do something like this
    a: function() { ... },
    b: alert,
    c: a
};

Obviously that doesn't work and I have to do something like this:

var obj = {
    a: function() { ... },
    b: alert,
};
obj.c = obj.a;

Is there any way to do that in the declaration?

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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted
var obj = { 
    a: function() { alert("hello")},
    b: alert,
    c: function(){return this.a()}
};

obj.c();

As SLaks mentioned, this won't work if the functions have properties (eg, prototype or arguments.callee).

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1  
This won't work if the functions have properties (eg, prototype or arguments.callee). –  SLaks May 12 '11 at 0:50
    
Thanks, that's a good point. Edited my answer. –  Kevin Ennis May 12 '11 at 0:54
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You can declare the function first and use it with a & c:

function f() { ... }

var obj = {
    a: f,
    b: alert,
    c: f
};
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You can put the value into a separate variable:

var temp = function() { ... };
var obj = { // I want to do something like this
    a: temp,
    b: alert,
    c: temp
};

However, you cannot do any better than that.

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If you want to do everything inside the object initializer, then you can have one property call the function from the other and relay any arguments using the Function.arguments property:

var obj = { 
    a: function() { ... },
    b: alert,
    c: function() { return this.a(arguments); }
};

However, your best bet might be to create a variable containing the anonymous function first, then assign its value to both properties in your object initializer:

var fn = function() { ... };
var obj = {
    a: fn,
    b: alert,
    c: fn
};

You can also do something like this, but I'd go with the approach one above:

var obj = { b: alert };
obj.a = obj.c = function() { ... };
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